Alex Farris – Anarchestra


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An evening pause: Who says you have to play the musical instruments that already exist? This guy decided he’d invent a few hundred of his own.

Hat tip Mike Nelson.

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3 comments

  • Michael Dean Miller

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    Screen shot looks like an afterburner injection shroud for a MIG-15.

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  • Andrew

    MIG 15 did not have afterburners.

    Many people, when looking at them, confuse the MIG 17 of the VietNam era with the 15 from the Korean War. The MIG 17 did have an afterburner. I have no idea about whether this came from a MIG or not. Given the primitive systems on the 17 I would think this piece was not from that either.

    Here is a nice video showing the parts of “an” afterburner from an unknown jet engine.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1DdF3U2g-Ic

    Oh, here is a video of the two machines. Very similar designs. The 17 is much more refined and described as a “Pilots Airplane.”

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B9hfUoYnP6Q

    and a page of images and drawings.

    https://www.startpage.com/do/search

    Have fun.

  • C Cecil

    FYI: This is an aircraft bypass turbofan daisy mixer. It mixes the bypass fan air with the hot core turbine exhaust. This increases thrust and reduces noise. I used to TIG weld these sections together for the Williams FJ44-2. They weren’t quite this big!! The mixer we produced had an off-the-shelf cost of about $8,000. Evidently the mixer this man is making music with must be an obsolete or damaged part. I would estimate an air-worthy one would be worth $25,000. These assemblies are made from stamped out sections that have to be fusion tack welded, hand-hammered on various mandrels for precision alignment and then hand fusion welded with inert gas back-up. Great work for a talented tin knocker! The material is usually 321 stainless.

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