An update on the ongoing X-37B mission


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An update on the ongoing X-37B mission.

I like this quote from the article:

Meanwhile, Boeing has begun to look at derivatives of their X-37B Orbital Test Vehicle — including flying cargo and crew to the International Space Station. Speaking this week at the Space 2011 conference —organized by the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA) and held in Long Beach, Calif. — Arthur Grantz of Boeing Space and Intelligence Systems sketched out a host of future uses for the space plane design. For one, the X-37B, as is, can be flown to the space station and dock to the facility’s common berthing mechanism. No new technology is required for X-37B to supply cargo services to the ISS, Grantz said. Also, an X-37C winged vehicle has been scoped out, a craft that would ride atop an Atlas 5 in un-shrouded mode.

The Boeing roadmap, Grantz added, also envisions a larger derivative of the X-37B space plane, one that can carry up to seven astronauts, as well as tote into Earth orbit a mix of pressurized and unpressurized cargo.

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4 comments

  • Joe2

    So Boeing would compete with its own CST-100.

    That should prove interesting.

  • Kelly Starks

    About time! This could be fielded a lot quicker then CCDev or CST-100 – it could even be offered as a alternative to COTS with a better system at lower cost.

  • Joe2

    You may be correct, but I wouldn’t want to be at the Boeing Board of Directors Meeting where this was discussed.

  • Kelly Starks

    Hey the CST-100folks might be mif’ed, but the bulk of their systems could be ported into the X-37B at lower cost adn risk then developing a CST-100 to carry it. Boards of directors like things that give cost and risk reduction.

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