Another Dawn image of some of Ceres’ bright spots

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The double bright spot, not over-exposed

Cool image time! As part JPL’s regular release of images from Dawn, one image of Ceres’ bright double spots was purposely not over-exposed. Thus, the surface is almost black (as it really looks), while the small cluster of spots stands out brightly but with some additional detail. (If you download the full image and use a graphics program to brighten it you will see that this is the double bright spot located inside a large crater.)

I have cropped and enlarged the original image to focus on the double spot. As you can see the brightest spot has a mottled look, almost like we are looking down at a snow-capped peak.

Though the leading theory remains that this is ice, this theory has not been confirmed yet. Make no assumptions or you may discover you are wrong.


  • Nick P

    Is this on the nightime side? If so, it’s awfully hard to see how this could be reflective ice.

  • As far as I understand, this is the daylight side. Ceres, like most asteroids, is very dark, about the color of coal.

  • PeterF

    Thus the reason it is so hard to locate asteroids. It will be a very long time before all of them are charted. Lots of places for space pirates to hide…

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