Because of a computer reboot, Rosetta’s revival from hibernation came 18 minutes late.


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Because of a computer reboot, Rosetta’s revival from hibernation came 18 minutes late.

[Rosetta] woke yesterday as planned, to the relief of ESA scientists – but the signal it sent home to confirm it was awake reached Earth late, fraying the nerves of some mission controllers in the meantime. Due to call at 1745 GMT, Rosetta did not announce its revival until 1818. Fifteen minutes could be explained because the spacecraft’s computer checked the on-board clock only every quarter of an hour. The additional 18 minutes, however, was a mystery.

Now, the telemetry has shown that soon after Rosetta’s first revival sequence had started, the on-board computer automatically rebooted and the sequence started again, causing 18 minutes of delay.

It seems all is well now, though the engineers plan to spend some time pinpointing the cause of the reboot.

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One comment

  • 12 String

    Sounds like they’re using Microsoft’s Windows XP… we know it takes forever for a reboot to go all the way through its checklist… 18 minutes is the low side of average time… ;-)

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