SpaceX in the news!


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Rather than have two more consecutive posts about SpaceX, I’ve decided to post these two together in an effort to avoid making this website look like a site totally devoted only to this one company.

The first story makes it clear that SpaceX will almost certainly fly the first unmanned demo missions of its manned capsule later this year. We should also get an idea whether the first manned flight will occur before the end of the year, or slip into 2019, in May.

The second story reveals once again the robust and growing financial value of SpaceX.

Elon Musk-led SpaceX Corp is raising $507 million in a new round of funding, valuing the company at around $26 billion, according to a filing seen by Reuters. New articles of incorporation filed by the company last week and sent to Reuters by private analytics firm Lagniappe Labs showed the addition of 3 million ‘Series I’ shares from a previous version filed in November.

The filing also gave the initial value of the Series I shares as $169, 25 percent higher than a value given in its previous fundraising round late last year.

As Al Jolson once said, “You ain’t seen nothin’ yet!” I expect that SpaceX’s value will only go up in the coming years.

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7 comments

  • geoffc

    Of interest in the Abort Test, it will be flying on a Block 5 booster. It is not expected that the booster will survive the abort scenario, so that is an expensive test, loosing a Block 5 booster. No doubt it will be the highest flight count booster at the time. But with 10 expected flights before refurb, it is unlikely to get any one booster to 10 by December unless the flight rate is amazingly high, and they just refly the same booster over and over again.

  • Kirk

    geoffc, why do you expect the in-flight abort test to be atop a Block 5 core? The core trackers I follow are predicting that it will use the second flight of a Block 4 core.

  • Kirk

    In other SpaceX news, the ASDS Of Course I Still Love You was towed out of Port Canaveral this afternoon in support of Monday’s launch of TESS. It’s about time they started recovering again! I haven’t seen a rocket land since early February. (This will be the first flight of the last Block 4 core, #1045.)

  • Localfluff

    $26 billion doesn’t look as a high valuation to me. Considering that SLS+Orion costs upwards $40bn, and SpaceX can deliver the same service. There’s a lot of money in the space business and I would value SpaceX to almost all of that, with huge profit margins when they transition from pushing the limits and expanding the market to consolidating total world market dominance in aerospace transportation.

    SpaceX isn’t on the stock market because it is Elon’s personal thing to go to Mars, and going public means having to compromise the mission with profit making. But is there any derivative papers one could buy on SpaceX? Some bet marked to their future financial results? There would surely be some popular demand for such a product.

  • geoffc

    @kirk – I guess I was thinking that unless they hold that core, and leave it sitting around, they shouold be all Block 5 all the time by December.

  • Captain Emeritus

    NASA’s Little Joe II solid fuel boosters qualified the Apollo command module abort procedures without wasting a Saturn V.
    Additionaly, STS-1 flew it’s mission, a stack of components never tested in flight together, with a crew.
    The Fed’s demand, and waste billions, on useless paper “feasibility” studies.

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