Storms on Titan dump a lot of liquid methane, quickly


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A new climate model for Titan that suggests the planet’s methane rainstorms occur about once a Saturn year (29.5 years) and at about 60 degree latitude correlates with Cassini surface data that found a high concentration of alluvial fans at that latitude.

“The most intense methane storms in our climate model dump at least a foot of rain a day, which comes close to what we saw in Houston from Hurricane Harvey this summer,” said Mitchell, the principal investigator of UCLA’s Titan climate modeling research group.

Sean Faulk, a UCLA graduate student and the study’s lead author said the study also found that the extreme methane rainstorms may imprint the moon’s icy surface in much the same way that extreme rainstorms shape Earth’s rocky surface. On Earth, intense storms can trigger large flows of sediment that spread into low lands and form cone-shaped features called alluvial fans. In the new study, the UCLA scientists found that regional patterns of extreme rainfall on Titan are correlated with recent detections of alluvial fans, suggesting that they were formed by intense rainstorms.

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One comment

  • LocalFluff

    I bet that climate models work better for Titan than for Earth, although a tiiiny little discrepancy in amount of data collected. Just because it is free from politics.

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