The engineering tests to try to save Kepler have found that the mission is essentially over.


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The engineering tests to try to save Kepler have found that the mission is essentially over.

A headline at this New York Times article, “NASA’s Kepler Mended, but May Never Fully Recover” is wrong, as the telescope has not been “mended.” They have found they might be able to do some limited science, at the most. NASA is going to review this possibility, weighing the cost versus the benefit, and decide in the fall.

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3 comments

  • Nancy Kitchin

    Robert,
    Why doesn’t one of these space exploring companies explore the option of rather than doing a lift off do an attaching to a satellite and let the satellite lift off the craft?
    Just wondering?
    Nancy Kitchin

  • Pzatchok

    I wonder if a private concern could be handed control and thus the take over the cost of using and maintaining Kepler until its just unusable at all?

    It doesn’t have the stability without the reaction wheels to look for exo planets but it could still be a very good standard telescope usable by university students for the next several years.

    Its is in a rather high orbit to be easily repaired by any ship we have operating now but maybe a way could be found to attach a new set of reaction wheels to it in an external cradle set up or something like that.

  • Edward

    Nancy,

    Can you please expand on this idea? I cannot quite picture it in my head.

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