Search Results for: bridenstine

Trump administration goes all in for LOP-G

The swamp wins! In a speech today Vice President Mike Pence made it clear that the Trump administration is giving its full endorsement to the construction of the Lunar Orbiting Platform-Gateway (LOP-G), as well as SLS and Orion. These big boondoggles, which will trap us in lunar orbit while the Chinese set up lunar bases and take possession of the surface and its resources, are going forward, with both the president’s support as well as Congress’s.

Providing further evidence that the Trump administration has bought into these projects, in his introduction of Pence NASA administrator Jim Bridenstine gave a big public endorsement to the executive secretary of the National Space Council, Scott Pace, a man who has been a big supporter of these projects of the bureaucracy. Pace believes we need these projects, despite the fact that they have been under construction for two decades, have cost an ungodly amount, and have literally flown nowhere.

Pence also said that they intend to have the space force a reality by 2020, and also hinted that the Trump administration is making a careful review on the future of ISS.

Overall, the speech was a big endorsement for government space, in every way, with the private sector designed not to lead as free Americans following their personal dreams but to follow, servants of the desires of the government and its wishes.

If you want to listen to about 30 minutes of pro-government promotion, I expect it will be posted here at some point.

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Boeing adjusts Starliner launch schedule after fuel leak during test

Capitalism in space: Yesterday Boeing pushed back its Starliner launch schedule as a result of the fuel leak problem that had occurred during an engine test of the capsule last week.

They now plan the first unmanned test flight around the end of this year, with the first manned flight in the middle of 2019.

As for the fuel leak,

several abort engine valves failed to close properly, causing a leak of toxic fuels. The test article was not damaged and no one was hurt, but the incident required an investigation with support from NASA.

Other reports say that 4 of 8 valves failed to close. There is no explanation about why this happened, but I find it a very strange technical failure. Building valves for spacecraft is not cutting edge design, or I wouldn’t think so.

Tomorrow NASA administrator Jim Bridenstine is going to make an announcement with some official launch dates for both Boeing and SpaceX. We shall see if SpaceX’s schedule gets pushed back as well.

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NASA wants to delay WFIRST to pay for Webb overruns

In testimony to Congress yesterday NASA administrator Jim Bridenstine said that the agency wants to delay the Wide Field Infrared Space Telescope to pay for the new cost overruns of the James Webb Space Telescope.

Bridenstine said during the hearing that no decisions had been made on how to cover those additional JWST costs. “By the 2020 timeframe is when we’re going to need to have additional funds. So between now and then we’re going to have to make determinations,” he said. “Right now that process is underway.”

He said those decisions would consider the guidance from decadal surveys and a desire to maintain a balanced portfolio of programs. He specifically assured one member, Rep. Mo Brooks (R-Ala.), that the extra funding would not come out of human spaceflight programs, particularly the Space Launch System. “This is relevant to the Science Mission Directorate exclusively, and that’s where, at this point, we’ve had discussions about what are the options going forward,” Bridenstine said.

Committee members used the two-and-a-half-hour hearing to express their frustrations with this latest delay, noting that the original concept for the mission [Webb] called for it to cost $500 million and launch in 2007, versus a current lifecycle cost of $9.6 billion and launch in 2021. “This is 19 times the original cost and a delay of 14 years,” said Rep. Lamar Smith (R-Texas), chairman of the committee. “It doesn’t get much worse than that.” [emphasis mine]

Only yesterday I speculated that the cuts to WFIRST were related to Webb. It turns out I was right.

I have highlighted above one detail revealed at the hearing. I have always though Webb’s initial budget was $1 billion with a launch date of 2011. It appears it was less, by half, and it was supposed to launch four years sooner. Makes this boondoggle even more of an embarrassment for NASA and the astrophysics community. And for the astrophysics community it is also a disaster, because Webb’s overruns for the past two decades essentially wiped out what had been a very vibrant space astronomy program at NASA.

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Changes to big August 3 commercial crew announcement do not bode well

On August 3 NASA is planning on making a big announcement concerning its commercial crew program. Yesterday the agency revealed that the NASA administrator, Jim Bridenstine, will reveal the names of the crew for the first commercial crew flight.

The changes in how that announcement will be made however suggest that they had hoped to make a bigger announcement and have been forced to back off. Initially, vice president Mike Pence was to have made the announcement. He has now canceled his participation. Also, there had previously been rumors that the announcement would have included the launch dates for both SpaceX’s and Boeing’s first flights. That the new press release makes no mention of dates suggests the dates have been delayed.

I hope I am wrong.

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What yesterday’s National Space Council meeting really reveals

Link here. While most news articles about yesterday’s third public meeting of the National Space Council are focused on Trump’s apparently off-the-cuff announcement that he wants a new military branch dubbed the “Space Force,” the story at the link provides a nice summary of the entire meeting, including a look at the presentations by four astronauts, two scientists, and one businessman.

The panel of former astronauts also offered some more general advice, including the importance of international and commercial partnerships, seeking bipartisan support to ensure the long-term viability of NASA’s exploration plan, and more outreach to the public. “We have got to get the support of the American people by getting the message out to people,” Collins said.

That panel came after another panel of two space scientists and one businessman who has flown payloads on the ISS. They argued for the importance of both human and robotic exploration, rather than one taking precedence over the other.

One of the astronauts came out against LOP-G, but his alternative suggestion was not really very different from that proposed by the other astronauts, calling for a massive NASA-run Apollo-style government space project:

Appearing on a panel during the meeting at the White House, Terry Virts said that the proposed Lunar Orbital Platform-Gateway, a human-tended facility in orbit around the moon, wasn’t an effective next step in human spaceflight beyond Earth orbit after the International Space Station. “It essentially calls for building another orbital space station, a skill my colleagues and I have already demonstrated on the ISS,” he said. “Gateway will only slow us down, taking time and precious dollars away from the goal of returning to the lunar surface and eventually flying to Mars.”

Virts wasn’t specific on what should replace the Gateway as that next step but called for an Apollo-like model of stepping-stone missions to return to the moon, with ISS, he said, serving well as the Mercury role.

Meanwhile, NASA administrator Jim Bridenstine gave his full endorsement of LOP-G.

Virts’ comments came after NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine said the Gateway played an essential role in developing a long-term, sustainable human presence at the moon. “This is our opportunity to have more access to more parts of the moon than ever before,” he said of the Gateway, a reference to its ability to shift orbits using its electric propulsion system. He also played up the role of the Gateway in bringing in international and commercial partners while taking a leadership role in space exploration.

“The goal is sustainability,” he said. “When we’re going to the moon, as the president said in his speech, this time we’re going to stay, and the Gateway gives us that great opportunity.”

What we can glean from these presentations, all very carefully staged by the council to support what it wants the government to do in space, is that the Trump administration is going full gang-busters for another big Kennedy-like government space program, launched by SLS. They haven’t announced it yet, but they are definitely moving to propose such a program.

And such a program will cost billions, take forever to do anything (if it does anything at all), and accomplish nothing but spread pork to congressional districts while sustaining the big space companies like Lockheed Martin and Boeing and possibly reshaping the new space companies — tempted by the big cash being offered by the government — into becoming as bloated and as uncreative.

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NASA administrator in talks about commercializing ISS

In a wide-ranging news article today, NASA administrator Jim Bridenstine revealed that the agency is in discussions with many private corporations about the possibility of privatizing ISS.

Bridenstine declined to name the companies that have expressed interest in managing the station, and said he was aware that companies may find it “hard to close the business case.” But he said there was still seven years to plan for the future of the station, and with the White House’s budget request “we have forced the conversation.”

Bridenstine’s approach to ISS’s future seems reasonable to me. At some point the federal government needs to face the station’s future, and now is a better time to do it then later.

The article however confirmed my generally meh opinion of Bridenstine. First, he reiterated his born-again new belief in human-caused global warming, a belief that seemed to arrive solely for him to gain the votes to get him confirmed in the Senate.

Second, he said this about LOP-G, NASA’s proposed international space station that would fly in lunar space.

Known as the Lunar Orbiting Platform Gateway, the system would be built by NASA in partnership with industry and its international partners, he said.

“I’ve met with a lot of leaders of space agencies from around the world,” he said. “There is a lot of interest in the Gateway in the lunar outpost because a lot of countries want to have access to the surface of the moon. And this can help them as well and they can help us. It helps expand the partnership that we’ve seen in low Earth orbit with the International Space Station.”

But the first element of the system wouldn’t be launched until 2021 or 2022, he said. [emphasis mine]

The highlighted words illustrate why Bridenstine seems like a lightweight to me. LOP-G might be flying near the Moon, but nothing about it will provide anyone any access to the lunar surface. Not only will it not be operational in any manner for more than a decade, at the soonest, but it doesn’t appear designed to make reaching the lunar surface any easier. Instead, it mostly seems designed to justify SLS and Orion, and provide that boondoggle a mission.

Still, Bridenstine has in the past been generally in favor of commercial space, and that position appears to be benefiting NASA’s commercial crew partners. Prior to Bridenstine’s arrival the decisions of NASA’s safety panel acted to repeatedly delay the launch of the manned capsules being built by SpaceX and Boeing. Now that safety panel seems to have seen the light, and is suddenly more confident in these capsules. I suspect Bridenstine might have had some influence here.

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Bridenstine confirmed as NASA administrator

After an eight month delay, caused partly by the refusal of any Democrats to vote for a Trump nominee, Congressman Jim Bridenstine (R-Oklahoma) was today confirmed as NASA’s administrator.

The vote passed 50-49, and only finally occurred because Senator Marco Rubio (R-Florida) decided to stop opposing Bridenstine.

I don’t think this nomination will matter much. The people who are really in charge of the U.S. space effort don’t work for NASA, and in fact are not even in the government. They also have enough financial power that they probably can force NASA to do what they want, over the long run. Bridenstine will I think carry water for them.

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NASA’s interim administrator to retire in April

NASA’s interim administrator, Robert Lightfoot, has announced that he plans to retire in April.

Lightfoot’s retirement leaves NASA without any leadership, as the Senate has shown no interest in confirming Trump’s candidate for the position, Congressmen Jim Bridenstine (R-Oklahoma).

All 49 Democrats in the Senate are expected to vote against to Bridenstine’s confirmation, and Sen. Marco Rubio (R-Florida) is also reportedly also opposed, Space News reported. Sen. John McCain (R-Arizona) is not in Washington as he undergoes treatment for cancer, leaving Bridenstine short of the 50 votes needed for confirmation.

Bridenstine is not a perfect choice, and I have reservations about his commitment to commercial space, but the reasons for the Democratic opposition is, as far as I can tell, the same as all their other opposition to every other Trump or Republican proposal: pure spite. “We hate it because of YOU!”

The lack of a politically appointed administrator at NASA however is not necessarily a bad thing, considering that the important stuff happening right now is not at NASA but in the private sector. Having NASA adrift for awhile might actually work to weaken NASA’s pork projects, SLS and Orion, that are in direct competition with private space.

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Factional bickering dominates nomination hearing for NASA administrator

Quite boring. Factional bickering yesterday between Democrats and Republicans dominated the nomination hearing of Congressman Jim Bridenstine (R-Oklahoma) for NASA administrator.

Today’s contentious nomination hearing for Rep. Jim Bridenstine (R-OK) to be NASA Administrator was split along partisan lines. Democratic Senators questioned his credentials and viewpoints about climate change, sexual harassment and other issues that could affect how he runs the agency and its personnel. Republicans defended him and chafed at the tenor of the hearing. The committee could vote as early as next week on whether to send the nomination to the full Senate.

I did not watch the hearing because I knew this would be what I’d see and I didn’t want to be bored for two hours. It ain’t news anymore to find Democrats opposing anything proposed by the Republicans. Furthermore, it doesn’t matter. Bridenstine will almost certainly be approved along partisan lines in the Senate, and nothing I have read about him suggests he is going to do anything significant or radical. He has made it clear, both in recent interviews and articles as well as his testimony yesterday as reported by numerous articles that he does not wish to rock the boat. He supports all of NASA’s current programs, commercial space, SLS/Orion, climate research, everything. I do not expect him to make any radical changes in the direction NASA is going.

In fact, the people who will change NASA are not even in the government. I expect the actions of Elon Musk and Jeff Bezos to have far greater impact in the coming years, with politicians and bureaucrats in NASA forced to follow them, as they have been forced to follow Musk during the past half decade.

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The first meeting of the National Space Council

The first meeting of the National Space Council just wrapped up. You can see highlights here. I have several thoughts.

The entire event was very carefully staged, with the planned outcomes determined beforehand. The three panels of speakers were organized to match up with the three main actions the council intended to pursue, with the questions from the various high level Trump cabinet members clearly arranged to line up with each panel. Moreover, the fact that all these panel members were there and participating in this staged event suggests that Trump himself is directly interested, and insisted they do so.

The first action was a decision to rework the country’s overall space policy, including its future goals for exploring the solar system. This action item was linked with statements by officials from Lockheed Martin, Boeing, and Orbital ATK, and was clearly intended to placate their desire to keep what they all called “sustained” and “reliable” funding. It was also clearly linked to Pence’s opening remarks, which insisted that the U.S. should return to the Moon, permanently, and use that as a jumping off point for exploring Mars and the rest of the solar system.

The second action was a commitment to review, in the next 45 days, the entire regulatory bureaucracy that private companies must face. This was linked to the testimony from officials from SpaceX, Blue Origin, and Sierra Nevada.

The third action was a focus on the military and national security aspects of space, focused on the development of a “space strategic framework” that will apparently link the military needs with the growing commercial space industry. This framework has been under development for several months. The council actually spent the most time questioning the national security witnesses on this issue. This focus also aligns with the main interest in space held by Trump’s nominee for NASA administrator, Congressman Jim Bridenstine (R-Oklahoma). Interestingly, Bridenstine was in the audience, but was given no speaking opportunity, unlike the NASA acting administrator, Robert Lightfoot, who Pence specifically provided a moment to speak.

Overall, this meeting indicates that the Trump administration is likely not going to do much to drain the swamp that presently dominates our space effort. Trump’s interest in reducing regulation remains strong, but it also appears he and his administration is also strongly committed to continuing the crony capitalism that is wasting literally billions of dollars in space and helping to put the nation into unrecoverable debt.

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Trump nominates James Bridenstine as NASA administrator

As expected for months, Trump late yesterday nominated Congressman James Bridenstine (R-Oklahoma) as the new administrator of NASA.

He will still have to be confirmed by the Senate. Interestingly, both Florida senators, a Democrat and a Republican, have announced their opposition to the nomination.

Bridenstine is somewhat in favor of private space, but previous analysis of his past proposals by myself and others has not been encouraging. What he will do as head of NASA however remains unknown. Based on his past statements, I would be surprised if he cut back on either commercial space or SLS.

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Congressman proposes new legislation to better regulate commercial space

We’re here to help you! In an effort to guarantee that the United States remains compliant with the UN Outer Space Treaty when its private citizens begin flying commercial operations in space, Congressman Bridenstine (R-Oklahoma) is proposing new legislation that would better supervise and regulate the emerging commercial space industry.

Bridenstine explained that his top concern is that a U.S. company will proceed with a plan to put a spacecraft on the Moon or conduct on-orbit servicing or some other new type of activity only to have a “near-peer” country like Russia or China complain at the last minute that the United States is violating the OST. That would put the United States “in a difficult position,” he argues. Therefore he sees the need for “airtight” legislation that sets up a process by which the government authorizes and supervises these private companies. Once a company has gone through the process, the United States can unequivocally demonstrate to the international community that it has, in fact, complied with the treaty.

The Obama Administration has been open to working with these new companies, but he wonders if that will remain true over the long term future. He insisted that Congress “needs to exert its authority and power so that whatever administration comes next or is in place 50 years from now, the process exists” and is not subject to a new administration’s “whims.” He also worried that without a legislative solution, it could become a matter of “executive branch regulation by default.” That opens the possibility of some agency saying no, with no recourse for the private sector.

Read the whole report at the link. If you believe in freedom, competition, and private enterprise, it will chill your bones. At no time does anyone suggest that maybe the United States should simply get out of the Outer Space Treaty, as we are legally allowed to do according to the treaty’s own language. The treaty itself is a very bad law, as it makes it impossible for any private citizen or company in space to be protected under U.S. law, leaving everything instead in the control of United Nations bureaucrats and the polyglot of nations, many quite tyrannical, that dictate UN policy. Bridenstine’s proposals will only make this situation worse, as it will not only keep all control in the hands of the UN, but it will saddle American citizens with further regulations imposed by our own government.

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Congressman proposes major changes to regulation of commercial space

Doug Messier has posted a detailed analysis of Congressman Jim Bridenstine’s (R-Oklahoma) proposed American Space Renaissance Act (ASRA) that is definitely worth reading.

Most of the changes appear aimed at organizing the regulation process of commercial space more completely under FAA control, rather than the hodge-podge of agencies that presently have responsibility. The bill also encourages NOAA and NASA to increase their use of commercial data for weather and Earth remote sensing.

At first glance, the bill looks good, but it also is not likely to be passed as written. Moreover, not surprisingly it calls for a hefty increase in funding for the FAA agencies being given more responsibilities, but I wonder if Congress will comparably reduce the funding of those agencies it takes responsibility from. My instinct tells me no, which means of course that the government and bureaucracy grows again.

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Past Appearances

  • Radio: December 22, 2015: 11:10 pm (Central), WCCO-AM, with Steve Thomson, Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minnesota.
  • Television: December 23, 2015, 4:15-4:20 pm (Mountain), CNN-Today, to discuss various lunar Earthrise images, past and present.
  • Radio: December 15, 2015, 7:00-9:00 pm (Pacific), The Space Show with David Livingston, webcast here.
  • Radio: November 27, 2015, 5:00-6:00 pm (Central), Pratt on Texas with Robert Pratt, aired on 790-AM KFYO in Lubbock, 1470-AM KYYW in Abilene, and 1290-AM KWFS in Wichita Falls.
  • Radio: May 22, 2015, 6:00 pm (Central), Pratt on Texas with Robert Pratt, aired on 790-AM KFYO in Lubbock, 1470-AM KYYW in Abilene, and 1290-AM KWFS in Wichita Falls.
  • Radio: December 23, 2014: 10:10 pm (Central), WCCO-AM, with Steve Thomson, Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minnesota.
  • Radio: December 16, 2014, 7:00-9:00 pm (Pacific), The Space Show with David Livingston, webcast here.
  • Radio: November 28, 6:00 pm (Central), Pratt on Texas with Robert Pratt, aired on 790-AM KFYO in Lubbock, 1470-AM KYYW in Abilene, and 1290-AM KWFS in Wichita Falls.
  • Radio: November 27, 2014: 10:10 pm (Central), WCCO-AM, with Steve Thomson, Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minnesota.
  • Radio: November 12, 5:06 pm (Central), Pratt on Texas with Robert Pratt, aired on 790-AM KFYO in Lubbock, 1470-AM KYYW in Abilene, and 1290-AM KWFS in Wichita Falls.
  • Radio: November 11, 2014, 7:00-9:00 pm (Pacific), The Space Show with David Livingston, webcast here. A post election analysis!
  • Radio: September 22, 6:06 pm to 7:00 pm (Central), Pratt on Texas with Robert Pratt, aired on 790-AM KFYO in Lubbock, 1470-AM KYYW in Abilene, and 1290-AM KWFS in Wichita Falls.
  • Radio: September 16, 2014, 10:00 pm to 11:00 pm (Pacific), Coast to Coast with George Noory
  • Radio: June 29, 2014: 3:10 pm (Central), WCCO-AM, with Steve Thomson, Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minnesota.
  • Radio: June 26, 2014: 10:30 pm (Central), WCCO-AM, with Steve Thomson, Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minnesota.
  • Radio: June 24, 2014, 7:00-9:00 pm (Pacific), The Space Show with David Livingston, webcast here.
  • Television: June 9, 2014, Beyond Belief with George Noory, thirty-one minute television interview, available as a podcast for viewing anytime, where I discuss the present and sad state of climate science.
  • Radio: December 27, 2013: 4:35 pm (Central), WCCO-AM, with Moose Miller, Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minnesota.
  • Radio: December 26, 2013: 10:10 pm (Central), WCCO-AM, with Steve Thomson, Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minnesota.
  • No John Batchelor show appearances from December 24 to January 1 due to the holidays.
  • Radio: December 17, 2013: 9:45 pm (Central), WCCO-AM, with Steve Thomson, Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minnesota.
  • Radio: December 6, 2013: 10:30 pm (Central), WCCO-AM, with Steve Thomson, Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minnesota.
  • Radio: December 3, 2013, 7:00-9:00 pm (Pacific), The Space Show with David Livingston, webcast here. This will be the tenth anniversary of my first appearance on the Space Show.
  • Radio: July 3, 2013: 11:10 am (Central), WCCO-AM, with Jordana Green, Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minnesota.
  • Radio: February 11, 2013: 8:35 pm – 9:00 pm (Central), WCCO-AM, with Steve Thomson, Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minnesota.
  • Radio: January 1, 2013: No John Batchelor Show appearance due to New Years holiday.
  • Radio: December 31, 2012, 8:35 pm – 9:00 pm (Central), WCCO-AM, with Steve Thomson, Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minnesota.
  • Radio: December 25 and 27, 2012: No John Batchelor Show appearances due to Christmas.
  • Radio: December 12, 2012: 11:00 pm (Eastern), special appearance on the John Batchelor Show, syndicated nationally, to talk about the implications of the North Korean rocket launch.
  • Radio: December 10, 2012, 2:00-3:30 pm (Pacific), The Space Show with David Livingston, webcast here.
  • Radio: November 29, 2012: John Batchelor Show appearance moved to Friday, November 30.
  • Lecture: November 29, 2012, the Iowa Chapter of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Ames, Iowa.
  • Lecture: November 13, 2012, the Atlanta Chapter of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Atlanta, Georgia.
  • Radio: November 8, 2012: John Batchelor Show appearance moved to Friday, November 9.
  • Radio: November 6, 2012: John Batchelor Show appearance moved to Monday, November 5.
  • Radio: November 1, 2012: John Batchelor Show appearance moved to Friday, November 2.
  • Radio: October 14, 2012, 5:35 pm – 6:00 pm (Central), WCCO-AM, with Steve Thomson, Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minnesota.
  • Radio: September 27, 2012, 9:35 pm – 10:00 pm (Central), WCCO-AM, with Steve Thomson, Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minnesota.
  • Radio: September 18, 2012, 7:00-9:00 pm (Pacific), The Space Show with David Livingston, webcast here.
  • Radio: August 27, 2012: 10:30 pm to 11:00 pm (Eastern), special appearance on the John Batchelor Show, syndicated nationally, to talk about Neil Armstrong and his life and impact on history
  • Radio: August 25, 2012, 3:30 pm – 3:45 pm (Central), WCCO-AM, with Steve Thomson, Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minnesota.
  • Radio: August 7, 2012: 11:00 pm to 11:30 pm (Eastern), the John Batchelor Show, syndicated nationally.
  • Radio: August 6, 2012: 11:00 pm to 11:30 pm (Eastern), the John Batchelor Show, syndicated nationally.
  • Radio: August 6, 2012, 9:05 pm – 9:30 pm (Central), WCCO-AM, with Steve Thomson, Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minnesota.
  • Radio: August 1, 2012: 10:45 pm to 11:00 pm (Eastern), special appearance on the John Batchelor Show, syndicated nationally, to discuss the possible transfer of aerospace technology to China.
  • Radio: July 12, 2012: John Batchelor Show appearance moved to Friday, July 13.
  • Lecture: July 6, 2012, 7:00 pm (Arizona), the Huachuca Astronomy Club, in the Community Room of Cochise College, Sierra Vista, Arizona.
  • Radio: July 5, 2012: John Batchelor Show appearance moved to Friday, July 6.
  • Radio: July 3, 2012, 7:00-9:00 pm (Pacific), The Space Show with David Livingston, webcast here.
  • Radio: May 31, 2012: John Batchelor Show appearance moved to Friday.
  • Radio: May 29, 2012, 8:05 pm – 8:30 pm (Central), WCCO-AM, with Steve Thomson, Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minnesota.
  • Radio: May 26, 2012, 10:00 pm to 11:00 pm (Pacific), Coast to Coast with John B. Wells
  • Podcast: Interview with Jason Hartman from the Holistic Survival Show on global warming and space exploration. Podcast available here.
  • Radio: May 21, 2012, 9:05 pm – 9:30 pm (Central), WCCO-AM, with Steve Thomson, Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minnesota.
  • Radio: May 2, 2012, 9:05 pm – 9:30 pm (Central), WCCO-AM, with Steve Thomson, Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minnesota.
  • Radio: January 26, 2012, 9:40 am to 10:00 am (Central), News92, Houston, Texas.
  • Radio: September 30, 2011, 9:05 pm – 10:00 pm (Central), WCCO-AM, with Steve Thomson, Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minnesota.
  • Radio: September 29, 10:15 pm (Eastern), the John Batchelor Show, syndicated nationally.
  • Television: September 15, 2011, 6:00 pm, Around Space, produced by DC-L5, the DC area chapter of the National Space Society and aired on Cox Cable and Verizon FiOS Channel 10. Repeated on September 16 at 8:30 pm and September 18 at 1:00 pm.
  • Radio: September 12, 2011, 2:00-3:30 pm (Pacific), The Space Show with David Livingston, webcast here.
  • Radio: September 8, 2011, 9:08 pm – 9:30 pm (Central), WCCO-AM, with Steve Thomson, Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minnesota.
  • Radio: September 4, 2011: No John Batchelor Show appearance.
  • Radio: September 1, 2011: No John Batchelor Show appearance.
  • Radio: August 27, 2011, 9:00 pm – 9:30 pm and 11:30 pm – midnight (Eastern), the John Batchelor Show, syndicated nationally.
  • Radio: August 23, 2011: No John Batchelor Show appearance.
  • Radio: August 21, 2011: No John Batchelor Show appearance.
  • Radio: August 2, 2011, 10:45 pm – 11:00 pm (Eastern), the John Batchelor Show, syndicated nationally.
  • Radio: July 31, 2011, 9:15 pm – 9:30 pm (Eastern), the John Batchelor Show, syndicated nationally.
  • Radio: July 28, 2011: No John Batchelor Show appearance.
  • Radio: July 21, 2011, 9:10 pm – 9:30 pm (Central), WCCO-AM, with Steve Thomson, Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minnesota.
  • Radio: July 8, 2011, 11:20 am (Central), Beyond the Headlines with Scott Braddock, KRLD 1080-AM, Dallas, Texas.
  • Radio: July 4,, 2011, 12 noon – 1:00 pm (Central), WCCO-AM, with Steve Thomson, Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minnesota.
  • Radio: July 3, 2011: No John Batchelor Show appearance.
  • Radio: April 28, 2011, 3:45 pm (Pacific), the Alan Stock Afternoon News Show, on KXNT 740-AM, Las Vegas, Nevada.
  • Radio: April 28, 2011, 8:20 am (Central), Morning News, on KTRH 740-AM, Houston, Texas.
  • Radio: April 24, 2011: No John Batchelor Show appearance.
  • Radio: April 22,, 2011, 9:05 – 9:30 pm (Central), WCCO-AM, with Steve Thomson, Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minnesota.
  • Radio: April 21, 2011: No John Batchelor Show appearance.
  • Radio: April 19, 2011, 9:50 am (Central), KRLD 1080-AM, Dallas, Texas.
  • Radio: April 14, 2011: No John Batchelor Show appearance.
  • Radio: April 8, 2011, 9:30-1:30 pm (Pacific), The Space Show with David Livingston, webcast here.
  • Radio: April 3, 2011, 11:30 pm – 11:45 pm (Eastern), the John Batchelor Show, syndicated nationally.
  • Radio: April 1,, 2011, 9:05 – 9:30 pm (Central), WCCO-AM, with Steve Thomson, Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minnesota.
  • Radio: March 12, 2011, 11:00 pm – 11:15 pm (Eastern), the John Batchelor Show, syndicated nationally.
  • Radio: March 10, 2011: No John Batchelor Show appearance.
  • Radio: March 1, 2011: No John Batchelor Show appearance.
  • Lecture: March 1, 2011, 5:00 pm – 9:00 pm (Eastern), keynote speech at the annual Rotunda Dinner for the student chapter of the AIAA at the University of Virginia, Charlottesville,
  • Radio: February 28, 2011, 11:30 pm – 11:55 pm (Eastern), the John Batchelor Show, syndicated nationally.
  • Radio: February 20, 2011, 11:30 pm – 11:45 pm (Eastern), the John Batchelor Show, syndicated nationally.
  • Radio: February 14,, 2011, 9:35 – 10:00 pm (Central), WCCO-AM, with Steve Thomson, Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minnesota.
  • Radio: February 14, 2011, 2:00-3:30 pm (Pacific), The Space Show with David Livingston, webcast here.
  • Radio: February 13, 2011, 11:30 pm – 11:45 pm (Eastern), the John Batchelor Show, syndicated nationally.
  • Lecture: February 8, 2011, 7:00 – 7:30 pm (Rocky Mountain), Sonora Astronomy Society, Green Valley, Arizona.
  • Radio: February 6, 2011, 11:20 pm – 11:45 pm (Eastern), the John Batchelor Show, syndicated nationally.
  • Radio: February 3, 2011: No John Batchelor Show appearance.
  • Radio: January 20, 2011, 11:45 pm (Eastern), the John Batchelor Show, syndicated nationally.
  • Lecture: January 14, 2011, 2:30 – 4:00 pm (Rocky Mountain), Anza Trail Elementary School astronomy club, Sahuarita, Arizona.
  • Radio: January 13, 2011, 9:10 – 9:30 pm (Central), WCCO-AM, with Steve Thomson, Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minnesota.
  • Lecture: January 11, 2011, 7:00 – 7:30 pm (Rocky Mountain), Sonora Astronomy Society, Green Valley, Arizona.
  • Radio: January 10, 2011, 11:30 pm (Eastern), the John Batchelor Show, syndicated nationally, to discuss today’s announcement of the discovery of an Earthlike planet.
  • Radio: January 6, 2011, 10:06 pm (Pacific), Coast to Coast with George Noory
  • Radio: December 30, 2010, 11:20 am (Central), KRLD 1080-AM, Dallas, Texas.
  • Radio: December 24 to December 31, 2010: No John Batchelor Show live appearances.
  • Radio: December 24, 2010, 9:30-11:30 am (Pacific), The Space Show with David Livingston, available as webcast.
  • Radio: December 20, 2010, 10:15 pm (Eastern), the John Batchelor Show, syndicated nationally.
  • Radio: December 17, 2010, 11:30 pm (Eastern), the John Batchelor Show, syndicated nationally.
  • Radio: December 16, 2010: No Thursday John Batchelor Show appearance.
  • Radio: December 7, 2010, 8:00 – 8:20 pm (Central), WCCO-AM, with Steve Thomson, Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minnesota.
  • Radio: December 2, 2010, 10:00 pm – 11 pm (Pacific), Coast to Coast with George Noory
  • Radio: November 25, 2010: No Thanksgiving John Batchelor Show appearance.
  • Radio: November 18, 2010, 9:30 pm to 9:45 pm (Eastern), the John Batchelor Show, syndicated nationally.
  • Radio: November 16, 2010, 7:00 am to 8:00 am (Pacific), KRSY-AM 1230, The Morning Show with Mike Shinaberry, Alamogordo, New Mexico.
  • Radio: November 14, 2010, 11:30 pm to 12:00 am (Eastern), the John Batchelor Show, syndicated nationally.
  • Radio: November 5, 2010, 9:30-11:30 am (PST), The Space Show with David Livingston, available as webcast.
  • Lecture: November 3, 2010, 5:30 pm, the AIAA Orange County section of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, at the Double Tree hotel, Orange County, California.
  • Radio: November 2, 2010: No Tuesday John Batchelor Show appearance.
  • Radio: November 1, 2010, 11:00 pm to 11:30 pm (EST), the John Batchelor Show, syndicated nationally. We will be discussing the threat of asteroid impacts on Earth with astronauts Rusty Schweikart and Tom Jones.
  • Radio: From February 9, 2010 to March 31, 2010: every Tuesday and Friday at 11:30 pm (EST), and Sunday at 11:50 pm (EST), the John Batchelor Show, syndicated nationally. Appearance times and days may vary, depending on events, with these changes shown below.
  • Radio: From December 1, 2009 to February 4, 2010: every Tuesday and Thursday at 11:30 pm (EST), and Sunday at 11:50 pm (EST), the John Batchelor Show, syndicated nationally. Interview times and days may vary, depending on events, with these changes shown below.
  • Lecture: October 14, 2006, New Frontiers Symposium, October 14, 2006, McNally Auditorium, St. Mary’s University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada.
  • Radio: August 29, 2006, 9:50 pm, 10:50 pm, or 11:50 pm, depending on outlet, John Batchelor Show, on XM radio and syndicated nationally.
  • Radio: August 28, 2006, 9:50 pm, 10:50 pm, or 11:50 pm, depending on outlet, John Batchelor Show, on XM radio and syndicated nationally.
  • Radio: August 23, 2006, 9:50 pm, 10:50 pm, or 11:50 pm, depending on outlet, John Batchelor Show, on XM radio and syndicated nationally.
  • Radio: August 21, 2006, 9:50 pm, 10:50 pm, or 11:50 pm, depending on outlet, John Batchelor Show, on XM radio and syndicated nationally.
  • Radio: August 16, 2006, 9:50 pm, 10:50 pm, or 11:50 pm, depending on outlet, John Batchelor Show, on XM radio and syndicated nationally.
  • Radio: August 9, 2006, 9:50 pm, 10:50 pm, or 11:50 pm, depending on outlet, John Batchelor Show, on XM radio and syndicated nationally.
  • Radio: August 7, 2006, 9:50 pm, 10:50 pm, or 11:50 pm, depending on outlet, John Batchelor Show, on XM radio and syndicated nationally.
  • Radio: August 2, 2006, 9:50 pm, 10:50 pm, or 11:50 pm, depending on outlet, John Batchelor Show, on XM radio and syndicated nationally.
  • Radio: June 28, 2006, 9:50 pm and 11:50 pm, John Batchelor Show, on XM radio and syndicated nationally.
  • Radio: June 26, 2006, 9:50 pm and 11:50 pm, John Batchelor Show, on XM radio and syndicated nationally.
  • Radio: June 19, 2006, 9:50 pm and 11:50 pm, John Batchelor Show, on XM radio and syndicated nationally.
  • Radio: June 14, 2006, 9:50 pm and 11:50 pm, John Batchelor Show, on XM radio and syndicated nationally.
  • Radio: June 12, 2006, 9:50 pm and 11:50 pm, John Batchelor Show, on XM radio and syndicated nationally.
  • Radio: April 26, 2006, 9:50 pm and 11:50 pm, John Batchelor Show, on XM radio and syndicated nationally.

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