Tag Archives: English

Why the English language is odd

Link here.

The writer outlines the history of English and how the many different languages that contributed to it caused it to be so different from most other languages. Some of the oddities he notes are quite fascinating because we English-speakers take them so much for granted. He only hints, however, at what is probably the English language’s greatest gift — its gigantic vocabulary resulting from its remarkable ability to absorb new words — which probably comes from that same polyglot history.

An Arizona nursing student was suspended from school and called a bigot because she requested one of her classes be taught in English.

An Arizona nursing student was suspended from school and called a bigot because she requested one of her classes be taught in English.

The student, Terri Bennett, 50, initially complained in April to school officials because she said the Spanish-dominated discussions in her class room were preventing her from learning, Townhall reported. The college nursing program director, David Kutzler, then allegedly called her “a bigot” and an expletive, and suspended her.

She has sued. The article also notes that the Arizona constitution requires schools to use English.

The new rules on naming and describing plants now allow scientists to do so in English instead of Latin.

A victory for English: As of January 1 the new rules for naming and describing plants have allowed scientists to do so in English instead of Latin, and to do so online.

The earlier code, which required botanists to both write diagnoses in Latin and publish only in print journals, made the documentation of new taxa a laborious process.

Historians identify early English scribes

Two University of York researchers have identified the scribes who first made copies of some of English literatures most important early works. Key quote:

The discoveries were the result of painstaking research in the London Metropolitan Archives, where the York scholars matched the handwriting of scribes copying important early English literary manuscripts with the hands of Guildhall clerks copying documents and custumals.