Conscious Choice cover

From the press release: In this ground-breaking new history of early America, historian Robert Zimmerman not only exposes the lie behind The New York Times 1619 Project that falsely claims slavery is central to the history of the United States, he also provides profound lessons about the nature of human societies, lessons important for Americans today as well as for all future settlers on Mars and elsewhere in space.

 
Conscious Choice: The origins of slavery in America and why it matters today and for our future in outer space, is a riveting page-turning story that documents how slavery slowly became pervasive in the southern British colonies of North America, colonies founded by a people and culture that not only did not allow slavery but in every way were hostile to the practice.  
Conscious Choice does more however. In telling the tragic history of the Virginia colony and the rise of slavery there, Zimmerman lays out the proper path for creating healthy societies in places like the Moon and Mars.

 

“Zimmerman’s ground-breaking history provides every future generation the basic framework for establishing new societies on other worlds. We would be wise to heed what he says.” —Robert Zubrin, founder of founder of the Mars Society.

 

Available everywhere for $3.99 (before discount) at Amazon, Barnes & Noble, and all ebook vendors, or direct from the ebook publisher, ebookit. And if you buy it from ebookit you don't support the big tech companies and I get a bigger cut much sooner.


Sunspots and climate

Scientists have found new evidence that the solar sunspot cycle has influenced the Earth’s climate in the recent past.

Sirocko and his colleagues found that between 1780 and 1963, the Rhine froze in multiple places fourteen different times. The sheer size of the river means it takes extremely cold temperatures to freeze over making freezing episodes a good proxy for very cold winters in the region, Sirocko said.

Mapping the freezing episodes against the solar activity’s 11-year cycle — a cycle of the Sun’s varying magnetic strength and thus total radiation output — Sirocko and his colleagues determined that ten of the fourteen freezes occurred during years when the Sun had minimal sunspots. Using statistical methods, the scientists calculated that there is a 99 percent chance that extremely cold Central European winters and low solar activity are inherently linked.

Also this:

In fact, studies have suggested that the extremely cold European winters of 2010 and 2011 were the result of the North Atlantic Oscillation, which Sirocko and his team now link to the low solar activity during that time. The 2010 and 2011 European winters were so cold that they resulted in record lows for the month of November in certain countries. Some who dispute the occurrence of anthropogenic climate change argue that this two-year period shows that Earth’s climate is not getting any warmer. But climate is a complex system, Sirocko said. And a short-term, localized dip in temperatures only temporarily masks the effects of a warming world. [emphasis mine]

Gee, it is nice of them to tell us that the “climate is a complex system,” as if the skeptics don’t argue this continually. As I’ve said more times than I can count, the climate is very complicated, which is why we really don’t yet understand it fully. In fact, the only ones who seem to think this issue is simple are the global warming activists, as it is they who claim that “the science is settled,” a claim that is pure foolishness at this time and is a perfect example of not recognizing that the climate is a complex system.

This new data point does not really settle anything. It does provide us further evidence that should the Sun enter another grand minimum, a period where there are no sunspots for decades, we should see a corresponding cooling of the Earth’s climate. And based on the Sun’s recent behavior, that possibility is considered by many solar scientists to be quite likely.

Readers!
 

I must unfortunately ask you for your financial support because I do not depend on ads and rely entirely on the generosity of readers to keep Behind the Black running. You can either make a one time donation for whatever amount you wish, or you sign up for a monthly subscription ranging from $2 to $15 through Paypal or $3 to $50 through Patreon.


Your support will allow me to continue covering science and culture as I have for the past twenty years, independent and free from any outside influence.


Your support is even more essential to me because I not only keep this site free from advertisements, I do not use the corrupt social media companies like Google, Twitter, and Facebook to promote my work. I depend wholly on the direct support of my readers.


You can provide that support to Behind The Black with a contribution via Patreon or PayPal. To use Patreon, go to my website there and pick one of five monthly subscription amounts, or by making a one-time donation. For PayPal click one of the following buttons:
 


 

Or with a subscription with regular donations from your Paypal or credit card account:


 

If Patreon or Paypal don't work for you, you can support Behind The Black directly by sending your donation by check, payable to Robert Zimmerman, to
 

Behind The Black
c/o Robert Zimmerman
P.O.Box 1262
Cortaro, AZ 85652
 

Or you can donate by using Zelle through your bank. You will need to give my name and email address (found at the bottom of the "About" page). The best part of this electronic option is that no fees will be deducted! What you donate will be what I receive.

4 comments

  • jwing

    Man-made global warming explained: It’s the SUN not my SUV.

  • Rene Borbon

    It cannot be the Sun, it would ruin all the global warming radicals’ ‘settled science’.

  • Dr. Kent L. Miller

    Given the debate in recent years about arctic ice, I went looking
    for some old observational data. Quite by accident, I stumbled across a
    surprising source: none other than Admiral Alexander Kolchak! Although he
    is better known for his role in the Russian Civil War, he was earlier an
    oceanographer and polar explorer. I am embarrassed to say that despite a
    life long interest in history and in science, this fact somehow escaped me.

    Given the debate in recent years about arctic ice, I went looking
    for some old observational data. Quite by accident, I stumbled across a
    surprising source: none other than Admiral Alexander Kolchak! Although he
    is better known for his role in the Russian Civil War, he was earlier an
    oceanographer and polar explorer. I am embarrassed to say that despite a
    life long interest in history and in science, this fact somehow escaped me.

    <a href="http://archive.org/details/problemsofpolarr28amer&quot; title="Problems of Polar Research, Amer. Geog. Soc., 1928″>

    Some other articles in that book are also interesting and some have plates.
    Startling to me was Figure 6 on page 14, which is a map showing, in black, the
    unexplored areas in the Arctic basin as of 1927. It brings home to me the
    message that most of our arctic data is recent, and that we must be careful about
    the quality of evidence used to support claims regarding long-term trends in
    the arctic (especially those regarding the ice pack).

  • Dr. Kent L. Miller

    I messed up the XHTML tags on my previous reply. Let me try it again.

    Given the debate in recent years about arctic ice, I went looking for some old observational data. Quite by accident, I stumbled across a surprising source: none other than Admiral Alexander Kolchak! Although he is better known for his role in the Russian Civil War, he was earlier an oceanographer and polar explorer. I am embarrassed to say that despite a life long interest in history and in science, this fact somehow escaped me.

    While I did not locate a copy of his original publication in Russian, I did find a reasonably well scanned copy of “Problems of Polar Research” with an English translation of his article.

    Problems of Polar Research, Amer. Geog. Soc., 1928

    Some other articles in that book are also interesting and some have plates. Startling to me was Fig. 6 on page 14, which is a map showing, in black, the unexplored areas in the Arctic basin as of 1927. It brings home to me the
    message that most of our data is recent, and that we must be careful about the quality of evidence used to support claims regarding long-term trends in the arctic, especially those regarding the ice pack.

Readers: the rules for commenting!

 

No registration is required. I welcome all opinions, even those that strongly criticize my commentary.

 

However, name-calling and obscenities will not be tolerated. First time offenders who are new to the site will be warned. Second time offenders or first time offenders who have been here awhile will be suspended for a week. After that, I will ban you. Period.

 

Note also that first time commenters as well as any comment with more than one link will be placed in moderation for my approval. Be patient, I will get to it.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *