A Christmas Carol


Week Four: Ninth Anniversary Fund-Raising Drive for Behind the Black
 

The fourth week of my annual anniversary fund-raising campaign for Behind the Black has begun.


I once again must thank the many readers and listeners who have generously donated this month. Right now there is a chance this will be the best fund-raiser ever, though only if a lot of people donate during the month's last ten days. If you want to help me continue my reporting, you can give a one-time contribution, from $5 to $100, or a regular subscription for as little as $2 per month.


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Behind The Black
c/o Robert Zimmerman
P.O.Box 1262
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As I have done in the past, to celebrate this Christmas day I give you the classic 1951 version of Charles Dickens’ A Christmas Carol, starring Alastair Sim It remains the best version, by far.

Dickens did not demand the modern version of charity, where it is imposed by governmental force on everyone. Instead, he was advocating the older wiser concept of western civilization, that charity begins at home, that we as individuals are obliged as humans to exercise good will and generosity to others, by choice.

It is always a matter of choice. And when we take that choice away from people, we destroy the good will that makes true charity possible.

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3 comments

  • wayne

    Art Garfunkel
    “Barbara Allen”
    1973 Grace Cathedral, New York.
    https://youtu.be/BxQdl9cP3e0
    5:25

    “A diary entry by Samuel Pepys on January 2, 1666 contains the earliest extant reference to the song. In it, he recalls the fun and games at a New Years party: “…but above all, my dear Mrs Knipp whom I sang; and in perfect pleasure I was to hear her sing, and especially her little Scotch song, of Barbary Allen.”

  • Tom

    Great film! Actually released with the title of “Scrooge” as it took liberties (aka artistic license) with the book’s story line. It did not do well in the States but, just like “It’s a Wonderful life” and “The Wizard of Oz”, time has proven the early critics wrong.

  • Don

    The George C. Scott version is excellent.

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