Astronomers take best image of Betelgeuse yet


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Betelqeuse

Using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array Telescope (ALMA), astronomers have produced the best picture of the red giant star Betelgeuse taken so far.

Using ESO’s Very Large Telescope astronomers discovered a vast plume of gas almost as large as our Solar System. Astronomers have also found a gigantic bubble that boils away on Betelgeuse’s surface. These features help to explain how the star is shedding gas and dust at tremendous rates (eso0927, eso1121). In this picture, ALMA observes the hot gas of the lower chromosphere of Betelgeuse at sub-millimeter wavelengths — where localised increased temperatures explain why it is not symmetric.

The image on the right is that image, slightly reduced to post here. The bulge on the star’s left illustrates the unevenness of the star’s upper atmosphere. I suspect that continuous observations would reveal the outer atmosphere waxing and waning almost like the stuff inside a lava lamp.

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2 comments

  • ken anthony

    Just remember not to say the name 3 times!

  • pzatchok

    If we can see a solar system sized object this nice just how much longer till we see earth sized planets clearly?

    And you must remember. If we can see them they can see us.

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