Boeing partners with commercial supersonic jet startup


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Boeing today announced that it is partnering with startup Aerion Corp to build a 12-passenger commercial supersonic jet, dubbed the AS2.

Boeing said it would provide engineering, manufacturing and flight-test resources to bring the AS2 to market. The amount of the investment wasn’t disclosed.

The first flight for the plane — which, at about 1,000 miles per hour, will cruise 70 percent faster than today’s quickest business jets — is scheduled for 2023. Launch customer Flexjet, a fractional aircraft operator, has ordered 20 of the models. The 12-passenger aircraft has a list price of $120 million.

This isn’t the first or only private effort going on right now to develop supersonic jets for commercial travel. Another company, Boom Supersonic, has raised significant capital and already has its own orders for planes, though as far as I can tell it did not fly its initial test flights in 2018, as they had promised.

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3 comments

  • David M. Cook

    Seems to me the supersonic ability can only be used over water, restricting the routes for this expensive feature.

  • eddie willers

    I remember sonic booms from my childhood. I thought they were great.

  • David M. Cook:

    The Wikipedia article notes that Aerion is looking at China as a major market, as that country is the size of the continental US, and does not have sonic boom restrictions.

    Even with 50 years of aerospace development to draw on since Concorde’s design, I think they are going to have a tough time making money with this. British Airways – Air France had the premier supersonic transport, and they couldn’t find enough people willing pay a substantial premium to sit in a cramped seat and save a couple of hours travel.

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