Conscious Choice cover

From the press release: In this ground-breaking new history of early America, historian Robert Zimmerman not only exposes the lie behind The New York Times 1619 Project that falsely claims slavery is central to the history of the United States, he also provides profound lessons about the nature of human societies, lessons important for Americans today as well as for all future settlers on Mars and elsewhere in space.

 
Conscious Choice: The origins of slavery in America and why it matters today and for our future in outer space, is a riveting page-turning story that documents how slavery slowly became pervasive in the southern British colonies of North America, colonies founded by a people and culture that not only did not allow slavery but in every way were hostile to the practice.  
Conscious Choice does more however. In telling the tragic history of the Virginia colony and the rise of slavery there, Zimmerman lays out the proper path for creating healthy societies in places like the Moon and Mars.

 

“Zimmerman’s ground-breaking history provides every future generation the basic framework for establishing new societies on other worlds. We would be wise to heed what he says.” —Robert Zubrin, founder of founder of the Mars Society.

 

Available everywhere for $3.99 (before discount) at Amazon, Barnes & Noble, and all ebook vendors, or direct from the ebook publisher, ebookit. And if you buy it from ebookit you don't support the big tech companies and I get a bigger cut much sooner.


Chang’e-5 lunar orbiter heading to Sun-Earth Lagrange point

The new colonial movement: Chinese engineers have decided to extend the mission of the Chang’e-5 lunar orbiter by shifting its orbit so that it is transferred to one of the five Sun-Earth Lagrange points.

Amateur radio operators first confirmed the Chang’e-5 orbiter was still in space and heading towards the moon. Official confirmation has now been provided as to the spacecraft’s status.

Hu Hao, a chief designer of the third (sample return) phase of the Chinese lunar exploration program, told China Central Television (Chinese) Dec. 20 that the orbiter is now on an extended mission to a Sun-Earth Lagrange point. Hu said the extended mission was made possible by the accurate orbital injection by the Long March 5 launch vehicle, the same rocket which failed in July 2017 and delayed Chang’e-5 by three years. The Chang’e-5 orbiter has more than 200 kilograms of propellant remaining for further maneuvers.

While unspecified, it is believed that the Chang’e-5 orbiter will enter orbit around L1, based on the reference to planned solar observations. The orbiter is equipped with optical imagers. The team will decide on a further destination after tests and observations have been conducted, Hu said.

It makes great sense to keep the orbiter operating, and since lunar orbits tend to be unstable, going to a Lagrange point makes even more sense.

However, this decision raises an interesting point for the future. There are only five Lagrange points in the Earth-Sun system. All have great value. All also can likely sustain a limited number of satellites and spacecraft. Who coordinates their operations? What happens if China fills each with its spacecraft? For example, the James Webb Space Telescope is aiming for Lagrange point #2, a million miles from Earth in the Earth’s shadow. While Chang’e-5 is presently heading to a different point, what happens if China changes its mind and puts Chang’e-5 in Webb’s way?

As far as I know, there has been no discussion of this issue in international circles.

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9 comments

  • janyuary

    “However, this decision raises an interesting point for the future. There are only five Lagrange points in the Earth-Sun system. All have great value. All also can likely sustain a limited number of satellites and spacecraft. Who coordinates their operations? …. For example, the James Webb Space Telescope is aiming for Lagrange point #2, a million miles from Earth in the Earth’s shadow. While Chang’e-5 is presently heading to a different point, what happens if China changes its mind and puts Chang’e-5 in Webb’s way?”

    Wow, good question … I suppose such conflicts are destined to occur, almost guaranteed. The biggest question is will they happen in our lifetimes? How will territorial wars in space affect citizens on earth?

    One thing is certain: Free people able to reap the rewards of their own labor and success, will be the first and best to create the technology (it’s why China is limited to copying others).

  • Ian C.

    While I don’t see much debate (if any) in the int’l community, military strategists are addressing the issue (of course). I’ve a couple of books on my desk that deal with “beyond Earth orbit” space security and developing “Lagrangian strategies.”

    So far, I cannot recommend any of them as I haven’t finished them. For your info, but on your own risk:

    “Space Strategy (2017)”
    https://www.amazon.com/Space-Strategy-Science-Technology-dp-1848219970/dp/1848219970/

    “Understanding Space Strategy: The Art of War in Space (2019)”
    https://www.amazon.com/Understanding-Space-Strategy-Power-Politics-ebook-dp-B07PF1LGFK/dp/B07PF1LGFK/

    “Deep Space Warfare: Military Strategy Beyond Orbit (2019)”
    https://www.amazon.com/Deep-Space-Warfare-Military-Strategy/dp/1476679266/

  • Dick Eagleson

    The thing about Lagrange points is that a given object can orbit one of these in a circular orbit of pretty much any diameter so there’s no obvious reason for crowding or collisions.

  • The weaponization of space. Can be laid firmly at the feet of the foreign born, islamist traitor, King Buraq Hussein (in the membrane).

    When during his administration, the Chinese exploded an object in space, as a test. To further their military goals.

    And Obama did zilch. Greenlighting space as a battlefield. When the World previously tacitly agreed (if not formally?). Not to weaponize space.

    And in such, the Chinese littered space. With thousands of pieces of debris. Turning it into a garbage dump. And knowing they could act with impunity (also banking on the Fraudulency. If not actually being a part of it).

    The future is so bright, I need welding goggles.

  • Edward

    Lagrange points are really fun. L4 and L5 points are more stable. They are like their own gravity wells, as though they were bowls in space that objects can roll around in, although the bowls are more kidney shaped than circular. It can take quite a bit of perturbation to knock or pull something out of L4 or L5. This is why we see Trojan asteroids at the Sun-Jupiter L4 and L5 points.

    L1, L2, and L3 are less stable, or are shallower bowls. It does not take as much perturbation to knock something from them, which is why we don’t see many asteroids in Jupiter’s other Lagrange points.

    Isn’t it fun how orbital mechanics creates such interesting and sometimes counterintuitive phenomena?

  • I remember reading this discussion in the late ’70’s, and fie on me for not remembering the books, but the discussion is not unfamiliar. This situation also comes up in sci-fi from time to time. Usually something blows up real good.

    Edward raises a good point. When I found out about Lagrange Points, I thought, “How can that be, there are no masses to create gravity wells?” Physics can be fun.

  • Col Beausabre

    “However, this decision raises an interesting point for the future. There are only five Lagrange points in the Earth-Sun system. All have great value. All also can likely sustain a limited number of satellites and spacecraft. Who coordinates their operations? What happens if China fills each with its spacecraft? For example, the James Webb Space Telescope is aiming for Lagrange point #2, a million miles from Earth in the Earth’s shadow. While Chang’e-5 is presently heading to a different point, what happens if China changes its mind and puts Chang’e-5 in Webb’s way”

    Ah, c’mon, Bob. The UN will allocate them. In a fair and equitable manner. Don’t worry, they won’t unfairly favor other countries

    What will the Harris’ Administration do. Why go along of course. They’re internationalists.

  • wayne

    The Expanse – S3 Ep3
    “Planetary Railgun Strike”
    https://youtu.be/ktyQJQ1DW1o?t=258

  • pzatchok

    As long as something mobile is in space, space is essentially weaponized, since it could be used as an impact device against anything else up there.

    When that no weapons in space idea came around they were talking about nuclear weapons being stored up there for future Earth side use attacks.

    Even if they accidentally fell and burned up they would be very dangerous and spread radioactivity over huge areas .

    Plus at the time odd things happened to electronics in space. Accidental nuclear explosions in space are not good for anyone.

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