Denmark facing the first “summerless” July in four decades


Genesis cover

On Christmas Eve 1968 three Americans became the first humans to visit another world. What they did to celebrate was unexpected and profound, and will be remembered throughout all human history. Genesis: the Story of Apollo 8, Robert Zimmerman's classic history of humanity's first journey to another world, tells that story, and it is now available as both an ebook and an audiobook, both with a foreword by Valerie Anders and a new introduction by Robert Zimmerman.

 
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"Not simply about one mission, [Genesis] is also the history of America's quest for the moon... Zimmerman has done a masterful job of tying disparate events together into a solid account of one of America's greatest human triumphs." --San Antonio Express-News

Does this mean anything? Denmark is facing the first July in four decades with no days warmer than 77 degrees Fahrenheit, the temperature the weather bureau there defines as a summer day.

According to the Danish Meteorology Institute (DMI), July is likely to end without a single ‘summer day’, which is defined as any day in which temperatures top 25C (77F) at least somewhere in Denmark. If the next five days come and go without hitting 25C as predicted, it will mark the first time that Danes will have suffered through a summer-less July in nearly four decades.

“There are only three years in our records in which July contains a big fat zero when it comes to summer days and temps above 25C. That’s 1962, 1974 and 1979,” climatologist John Cappelen said on the DMI website. DMI’s database goes back to 1874.

Actually, this doesn’t mean a lot. It is however an interesting factoid that once again raises questions about the NASA and NOAA claims that this year (along with the past few years) were the hottest on record.

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5 comments

  • wayne

    Mr. Z.
    How is “summer” defined in the United States?

    My gas-utility always lists the number of ‘degree-heating’ days in my billing period in Winter, and the electric utility does the same for degree-cooling days in Summer. (Which they count up/down from 72 degrees, and allows me to compare my bills.)

    Har…. I thought “1939 was the hottest summer EVER on Earth!”

  • Joe

    I agree with Robert, this is an anomaly, nothing that hasn’t happened before, in Michigan we can have some rather brutal winter and summer weather, or it can be nearly benign, some summers where it struggles to go much farther than the mid 80’s and some winters in southern mi where it dosent go below -5 for more than a day for the entire winter, or where we struggle with winter weather where 0 might be our high, it’s all normal.

  • wayne

    Joe-
    ya’ got that right!

    Isn’t our un-official State Motto, “if you don’t like the weather, wait 5 minutes.”

  • Joe

    Wayne, you know it’s bad when Lake Michigan freezes over, you guys lose the lake effect snow, but the temps really dip! Yes Michigan has the five minute rule!

  • wayne

    “Animation of Historical Great Lakes Ice Cover”
    1973- present
    https://www.glerl.noaa.gov//data/ice/historicalAnim/

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