Conscious Choice cover

From the press release: In this ground-breaking new history of early America, historian Robert Zimmerman not only exposes the lie behind The New York Times 1619 Project that falsely claims slavery is central to the history of the United States, he also provides profound lessons about the nature of human societies, lessons important for Americans today as well as for all future settlers on Mars and elsewhere in space.

 
Conscious Choice: The origins of slavery in America and why it matters today and for our future in outer space, is a riveting page-turning story that documents how slavery slowly became pervasive in the southern British colonies of North America, colonies founded by a people and culture that not only did not allow slavery but in every way were hostile to the practice.  
Conscious Choice does more however. In telling the tragic history of the Virginia colony and the rise of slavery there, Zimmerman lays out the proper path for creating healthy societies in places like the Moon and Mars.

 

“Zimmerman’s ground-breaking history provides every future generation the basic framework for establishing new societies on other worlds. We would be wise to heed what he says.” —Robert Zubrin, founder of founder of the Mars Society.

 

Available everywhere for $3.99 (before discount) at Amazon, Barnes & Noble, and all ebook vendors, or direct from the ebook publisher, ebookit. And if you buy it from ebookit you don't support the big tech companies and I get a bigger cut much sooner.


Earthlike exoplanet discovered orbiting the nearest star

Worlds without end: An Earthlike exoplanet has been discovered in the habitable zone and orbiting Proxima Centauri, the nearest star to the Sun.

The CBC/AP story above doesn’t give many details, mainly because this story is breaking the Thursday embargo, when the actual science paper will be released. Expect a lot more news stories then about this, which probably ranks as one of the biggest science discoveries in history.

Since the embargo is broken, here are some facts from one of the press releases:

The planet, called Proxima b, orbits its parent star every 11 days and has a temperature suitable for liquid water to exist on its surface. This rocky world is a little more massive than the Earth, and is the closest planet outside our solar system. Planets around other stars are commonly referred to as exoplanets.

…Although Proxima b orbits much closer to its star than Mercury does to the Sun in the solar system, the star itself is far fainter than the sun. As a result Proxima b lies well within the habitable zone around the star and has an estimated surface temperature that would allow the presence of liquid water. Despite the temperate orbit of Proxima b, the conditions on the surface may be strongly affected by the ultraviolet and X-ray flares from the star — these would be far more intense than those the Earth experiences from the Sun.

They first had a hint of the planet’s existence in 2013 (which explains the unsourced rumors I’ve heard periodcally in the past few years about a exoplanet around Proxima Centauri) and spent the past two-plus years making absolutely sure they understood their data.

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5 comments

  • Alex

    That would be great, I hope it is no false alarm as some years ago.

  • Localfluff

    I’m not surprised that this comes a month before the Gaia space telescope finally releases its first data, after more than two years of secrecy. It seems to be a trend that astronomers rush to publish something before a great telescope or probe is about to release its data to confirm it. I can understand it for Pluto, whose moons were discovered by telescopes, because it could help the New Horizons mission as it flew by. But why not wait a month with publishing this, to see if Gaia confirms it? Well, because of personal prestige, I suppose, I suspect.

    Certainly Gaia’s extreme precision astrometry will detect an exoplanet that close to our nearest star.

    Hard radiation which kills us, could be a great energy source for other lifeforms. We have examples of it on Earth, although the evil ozon layer blocks their energy source, so that they thrive most at places like Chernobyl where we humans feed them with the rare radiactivity they depend on.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Radiotrophic_fungus

  • Alex

    Localfluff: I such case is not the telescope as such very important but the attached spectrometer.

  • Edward

    Localfluff wrote: “But why not wait a month with publishing this, to see if Gaia confirms it? Well, because of personal prestige, I suppose, I suspect.”

    It may be less for personal prestige and more to justify the grant money. The group or person funding research such as this has done so with the expectation that the money went to discover something new (unless the grant was specifically to confirm a discovery). Thus, scientists who have a new finding are eager to tell the world about it before they get scooped.

    Would you continue to fund scientists who didn’t publish their findings before someone else did? I suspect that you would be more likely to fund the someone else, because he was getting results for his funding.

    The opposite problem is publishing too soon but being wrong. Pons and Fleischmann are examples of this. So far, no one has been able to duplicate their results, but the world keeps expecting cold fusion cars any day now.

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