Getting rid of health insurance and paying your doctor direct.


Genesis cover

On Christmas Eve 1968 three Americans became the first humans to visit another world. What they did to celebrate was unexpected and profound, and will be remembered throughout all human history. Genesis: the Story of Apollo 8, Robert Zimmerman's classic history of humanity's first journey to another world, tells that story, and it is now available as both an ebook and an audiobook, both with a foreword by Valerie Anders and a new introduction by Robert Zimmerman.

 
The ebook is available everywhere for $5.99 (before discount) at amazon, or direct from my ebook publisher, ebookit.

 
The audiobook is also available at all these vendors, and is also free with a 30-day trial membership to Audible.
 

"Not simply about one mission, [Genesis] is also the history of America's quest for the moon... Zimmerman has done a masterful job of tying disparate events together into a solid account of one of America's greatest human triumphs." --San Antonio Express-News

The future: Getting rid of health insurance and paying your doctor direct.

The only good that might come from Obamacare is that it will so mess up the healthcare insurance industry that medical treatment will be forced to return to the simpler and more efficient system where the patient buys the doctor’s services direct and no insurance is involved.

Readers!
 

We are now in the third week of my annual July fund-raiser for Behind the Black. My deep thanks to everyone who has so far donated or subscribed. The response this year has been wonderful.
 

We are not done yet. This monthly fund-raiser is now half over, and I am hoping the second half will result in as many donations as the first half did. If it does, I will remain free to continue my writing as I see fit, unblemished by the efforts of others to squelch my perspective in this increasingly intolerant world.
 

This year's fund-raising drive is also significant in that it celebrates the 10th anniversary of this website's founding. It is hard to believe, but I have been doing this for a full decade, during which I have written more than 22,000 posts, of which more than 1,000 were essays and almost 2,600 were evening pauses.
 

Therefore, I hope you will please consider donating to Behind the Black, by giving either a one-time contribution or a regular subscription, as outlined in the tip jar below. Your support will allow me to continue covering science and culture as I have for the past twenty years, independent and free from any outside influence.


 

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If Paypal doesn't work for you, you can support Behind The Black directly by sending your donation by check, payable to Robert Zimmerman, to
 
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6 comments

  • Jwing

    If people can pay their garage mechanic $60 per hour to fix those unexpected car problems as well as pay cash for the regular maintenance (oil changes, replace & rotate tires) on top of cash for gasoline at close to $4 per gallon, without a need for a third party insurer, then I do believe we can create a healthcare delivery system that does the same. Heck, people manage to find the find the money to take care of their cars and many actually take better care of their vehicles than their own bodies.
    Let’s finally get rid of the middle man in healthcare for basic routine care. Can you imagine if you had to have third party car maintenance coverage in order to get a brake job and transmission replaced. No American would stand for it but we gladly have accepted every form of private and government third party player to get between us and our doctor. Crazy!

  • Steve Mackelprang

    This is happening now on a scale which would surprise most folks.

  • I’ve been following this model for a while. My health care costs are very reasonable, as my doctor doesn’t accept insurance, and does basic lab work in-house. In my 20’s and early 30’s I suffered a number of traumatic injuries, mostly related to racing bicycles. Sometimes I had insurance, other times I didn’t. I noticed that I received care more promptly when I flashed the insurance card, but I was always treated, regardless. When I paid cash, I always had my bills cut by 30% (the ‘cash’, or ‘uninsured’ discount). Sure, sometimes bills took years to pay, but I paid them. I also found that it pays to go over medical bills with a fine-tooth comb. It’s easy to find hundreds of dollars in savings. I was once charged $12 for an aspirin: I’m allergic to aspirin.

    The bottom line is that people need to get back to accepting responsibility for themselves. Decades of political rhetoric have convinced folks that they have to have health insurance, and it’s just not so.

  • I’ve heard radio ads touting ‘automotive repair insurance’. This is a horrible idea, for the same reasons universal health care insurance is a bad idea. I haven’t noticed this concept getting much traction.

  • Pzatchok

    ” Can you imagine if you had to have third party car maintenance coverage in order to get a brake job and transmission replaced. No American would stand for it but we gladly have accepted every form of private and government third party player to get between us and our doctor. Crazy!”

    One of the reasons for that is the fact that as repair costs get to high we just toss out the car and get another.

    I can’t see doing that with our bodies yet. So yes people are forced to pay what ever is charged for major medical problems. So since they are forced to pay for it no matter what or die, they see a smaller payment through insurance of some type as a viable alternative.

    If you could NEVER get another vehicle you would pay anything to keep the one you have running.

  • Your point is well taken.

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