Conscious Choice cover

From the press release: In this ground-breaking new history of early America, historian Robert Zimmerman not only exposes the lie behind The New York Times 1619 Project that falsely claims slavery is central to the history of the United States, he also provides profound lessons about the nature of human societies, lessons important for Americans today as well as for all future settlers on Mars and elsewhere in space.

 
Conscious Choice: The origins of slavery in America and why it matters today and for our future in outer space, is a riveting page-turning story that documents how slavery slowly became pervasive in the southern British colonies of North America, colonies founded by a people and culture that not only did not allow slavery but in every way were hostile to the practice.  
Conscious Choice does more however. In telling the tragic history of the Virginia colony and the rise of slavery there, Zimmerman lays out the proper path for creating healthy societies in places like the Moon and Mars.

 

“Zimmerman’s ground-breaking history provides every future generation the basic framework for establishing new societies on other worlds. We would be wise to heed what he says.” —Robert Zubrin, founder of founder of the Mars Society.

 

Available everywhere for $3.99 (before discount) at Amazon, Barnes & Noble, and all ebook vendors, or direct from the ebook publisher, ebookit. And if you buy it from ebookit you don't support the big tech companies and I get a bigger cut much sooner.


House slams military for not reforming contracting for space missions

Government marches on, to nowhere! The House Appropriations Committee has issued a report strongly criticizing the Air Force and the new Space Force for its failure to reform in any way its contract acquisition management, even though that was the prime reason Congress created the Space Force in the first place.

The report dedicates an entire page to detailing the committee’s dissatisfaction with what it sees as foot-dragging on space acquisition reform — which was one of the primary congressional rationales for the creation of the new space service in the first place. Indeed, the [appropriations committee] reiterates: “The Committee believes the Space Force was established to bring greater attention and focus to fixing its acquisition issues because previous attempts to do so did not produce lasting results.”

The [committee’s] concerns include that that Department of the Air Force — which oversees the Space Force much as the Navy oversees the Marine Corp — still has no clear plan for creating a separate management chain for space acquisition. Similar concerns were voiced at a May hearing by both the chair and ranking members of the HAC defense subcommittee, Rep. Betty McCollum, D-Minn., and Rep. Ken Calvert, R-Calif., respectively.

None of this should be a surprise. The reason the Space Force was advocated by some reformers was to get it out from under Air Force control and allow it to decide for itself what it needed. The belief was that this would streamline contracting and project development.

The fear, which I expressed repeatedly, was that the swamp in Washington would instead use this as an opportunity not to streamline operations but to create a whole new bureaucracy. That is standard operating procedure for government bureaucracies. Any time Congress has mandated a new agency designed to reduce bureaucracy it has for more than a century instead led to a larger bureaucracy, with nothing streamlined.

It appears the latter is what is now happening with the Space Force.

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3 comments

  • Col Beausabre

    If you think that’s bad, this is a chart of the DOD acquisition process

    https://i0.wp.com/hjspllc.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/04/DAUlarge.jpg?ssl=1

    Designed to move slowly while spending gobs of money

    It should be acknowledged that a fair bit of this is due to Congressional mandates on various parts of the process that the military must comply with

    I thank the Gods that I was in combat arms, where the worst that could happen to me was I could get my head blown off

  • Icepilot

    Military procurement has been out of control for more than half a century. There is zero reason to be frugal for either the customer or the builder. And there are zero consequences to the military senior officers or the SES Defense bureaucrats who consistently over promise on schedule, cost & capabilities in the never-ending race to create the perfect powerpoint presentation. Just multiply cost & schedule by three for any program that passes a Critical Design Review & you’ll do better than the Pentagon. It turns out that any system built w/parts from every State in the Union* gets kinda pricey.
    *not because it makes any sense, but it does maximize political support

  • Jeff Wright

    Just get the deadwood out and put the true pro spacers in. Kill off the Air Force and put the blue suits back under the ARMY air corps

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