Conscious Choice cover

From the press release: In this ground-breaking new history of early America, historian Robert Zimmerman not only exposes the lie behind The New York Times 1619 Project that falsely claims slavery is central to the history of the United States, he also provides profound lessons about the nature of human societies, lessons important for Americans today as well as for all future settlers on Mars and elsewhere in space.

 
Conscious Choice: The origins of slavery in America and why it matters today and for our future in outer space, is a riveting page-turning story that documents how slavery slowly became pervasive in the southern British colonies of North America, colonies founded by a people and culture that not only did not allow slavery but in every way were hostile to the practice.  
Conscious Choice does more however. In telling the tragic history of the Virginia colony and the rise of slavery there, Zimmerman lays out the proper path for creating healthy societies in places like the Moon and Mars.

 

“Zimmerman’s ground-breaking history provides every future generation the basic framework for establishing new societies on other worlds. We would be wise to heed what he says.” —Robert Zubrin, founder of founder of the Mars Society.

 

Available everywhere for $3.99 (before discount) at Amazon, Barnes & Noble, and all ebook vendors, or direct from the ebook publisher, ebookit. And if you buy it from ebookit you don't support the big tech companies and I get a bigger cut much sooner.


Hubble remains out of commission, with no repair date in sight

According to a statement to Space.com provided by the engineers trying to fix the Hubble Space Telescope, “there is no definitive timeline for bringing the computer back online.”

The Hubble operations team is working to solve the payload computer issue onboard the Hubble Space Telescope. The team is working to collect all the data available to them to isolate the problem and determine the best path forward for bringing the computer back to operations. At this time, there is no definitive timeline for bringing the computer back online. However, the team has multiple options available to them and are working to find the best solution to return the telescope to science operations as soon as possible.

…Assuming that this problem is corrected via one of the many options available to the operations team, Hubble is expected to continue yielding amazing discoveries into the late 2020s or beyond,” the operations team at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Maryland told Space.com in an email. However, “there is no definitive timeline yet as to when this will be completed, tested and brought back to operational status,

I gather from this that they do have options to might fix the problem, but they have also found the problem to be more complex than expected.

While I honestly am confident these engineers can bring the telescope back to life, we must all be prepared for the strong possibility that this might be the moment when such a repair is impossible. If so, our vision of the heavens will once again be blinded by the poor vision available to us from inside the Earth’s atmosphere. And that vision will not be cleared in the foreseeable future by an American or western optical space telescope, as none are being designed, no less built.

The Chinese however are building one, for their purposes, which will be better than Hubble and is set to launch within the next few years to fly in formation with their new space station, close by so that astronauts can do repairs if necessary.

Readers!
 

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4 comments

  • John

    “Hubble is expected to continue yielding amazing discoveries into the late 2020s or beyond”.

    I thought I read about a bunch of problems, probably here: they’re down to the last reaction wheel, they had different computer glitch, and the optics were saved from getting fried from a sunshade glitch only by luck.

    Makes you wonder if the PR person believed it, knew they were exaggerating, or knew they were lying. I wonder that a lot lately.

  • John: NASA PR people always sugarcoat every situation. Normally I delete such blather from the quotes I use, but in this case it wasn’t really practical.

    Approach what they say with a skeptical eye however is very wise.

  • David M. Cook

    It‘s a shame the government didn‘t build 3 Hubble ‘scopes, or 6, or 12! The builders said they “flew the prototype”, so later versions should be cheaper & better (NOT faster!). Building only one unit was foolish.

  • Jay

    David,
    Maybe they did? I have always wondered how different the KH-11 NRO satellites are to the HST. I know both were built to the standard to be carried by the space shuttle, similar in appearance, both built by Lockheed, and the mirror on the KH-11 is larger. I just wonder about if both satellites used any shared components; like the gyroscopes for example.

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