NASA considering shutting down Curiosity in 2021


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Even as the space agency is about to launch a new rover to Mars, it is considering cutting operations for the rover Curiosity as well as considering shutting down its operation as soon as 2021.

Other ongoing missions are threatened by the administration’s fiscal year 2021 budget proposal. “The FY21 budget that the president just recently submitted overall is extremely favorable for the Mars program, but available funding for extended mission longevity is limited,” [said Jim Watzin, director of NASA’s Mars exploration program].

That request would effectively end operations of the Mars Odyssey orbiter, launched in 2001, and reduce the budget for Curiosity from $51.1 million in 2019 to $40 million in 2021, with no funding projected for that rover mission beyond 2021.

The penny-wise-pound-foolish nature of such a decision is breath-taking. Rather than continue, for relatively little cost, running a rover already in place on Mars, the agency will shut it down. And why? So they can initiate other Mars missions costing millions several times more money.

Some of the proposed cuts, such as ending the U.S. funding for Europe’s Mars Express orbiter, make sense. That orbiter has accomplished relatively little, and Europe should be paying for it anyway.

These decisions were announced during a live-stream NASA townhall that was originally to have occurred live at the cancelled Lunar & Planetary Science conference. I suspect its real goal is to garner support for more funding so that the agency will not only get funds for the new missions, it will be able to fund the functioning old ones as well.

Sadly, there would be plenty of money for NASA’s well-run planetary program if our Congress and NASA would stop wasting money on failed projects like Artemis.

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4 comments

  • MJMJ

    I think the probability of shutting down an operational craft, especially one as prominent as Curiosity, is near zero. My betting is that someone at NASA is trying to make a point with this about budgets.

  • Lee S

    I can’t believe NASA would do this either….have they ever pulled the plug on a healthy active mission which is still returning unique and important science? I can’t think of one in my adult lifetime…
    I certainly hope it is a push for funding…. Otherwise it’s a deeply stupid idea.

  • foxbat

    lot of money in STS …. think of all the science missions that boondoggle could fund

  • Michael

    In that it is the most stupid decision NASA could make I expect that the shutdown will happen. I suspect it is a case of one bureaucracy overwhelming another.

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