Petroglyphs found depicting the earliest leashed dogs?


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Archaeologists have found petroglyphs in Saudi Arabia that could be the earliest depiction of dogs being held by leashes.

Carved into a sandstone cliff on the edge of a bygone river in the Arabian Desert, a hunter draws his bow for the kill. He is accompanied by 13 dogs, each with its own coat markings; two animals have lines running from their necks to the man’s waist.

The engravings likely date back more than 8000 years, making them the earliest depictions of dogs, a new study reveals. And those lines are probably leashes, suggesting that humans mastered the art of training and controlling dogs thousands of years earlier than previously thought.

The dating however remains uncertain. The carvings could be much younger.

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