Readers!
 

Scroll down to read this post.

 

I am now running my annual July fund-raising campaign to celebrate the twelfth anniversary of the establishment of Behind the Black. For many reasons, mostly political but partly ethical, I do not use Google, Facebook, Twitter. These companies practice corrupt business policies, while targeting conservative websites for censoring, facts repeatedly confirmed by news stories and by my sense that Facebook has taken action to prevent my readers from recommending Behind the Black to their friends.

 

Thus, I must have your direct support to keep this webpage alive. Not only does the money pay the bills, it gives me the freedom to speak honestly about science and culture, instead of being forced to write it as others demand.

 

Please consider donating by giving either a one-time contribution or a regular subscription, as outlined in the tip jar below.

 

Regular readers can support Behind The Black with a contribution via paypal:

Or with a subscription with regular donations from your Paypal or credit card account:


If Paypal doesn't work for you, you can support Behind The Black directly by sending your donation by check, payable to Robert Zimmerman, to
 
Behind The Black
c/o Robert Zimmerman
P.O.Box 1262
Cortaro, AZ 85652

 

You can also support me by buying one of my books, as noted in the boxes interspersed throughout the webpage or shown in the menu above. And if you buy the books through the ebookit links, I get a larger cut and I get it sooner.


Pushback: Threatened with blacklisting, a conservative student fought back so hard she is now in charge

Olivia Gallegos
Gallegos is also participating in Wichita State’s
first Collegiate Leadership Competition

Don’t comply! In February I wrote a pushback story about Olivia Gallegos, an Hispanic conservative at Wichita State University who, when denied nomination as a candidate for the student government for daring to nominate a conservative for recognition, not only refused to take a racial sensitivity class, put together a write-in campaign and won election to the student government anyway.

Her victory also included getting the Wichita student supreme court to overturn the decision of the student government to deny her conservative student club from getting official status at the college.

It appears Gallegos did not take even these victories lying down. She followed them up by running for president of that student government, and then winning that election on April 6th. The election also saw the defeat of one of the main accusers against Gallegos who had led the charge to block the conservative student club.

As a result, Gallegos is now the leader of the student government that only six months earlier had been dedicated to censoring and blacklisting conservatives.

Gallegos did not campaign and win as a conservative, however, but as someone dedicated to “a four-point platform of transparency, financial literacy, mental health and safety.” As she said during a public town hall meeting during the campaign:

“In recent years it has become a very politicized organization and it doesn’t need to be that way,” Gallegos said. “We want to be able to make sure that things are not so political and not so hostile to any student group.”

She also stated no hostility to the many other leftist and racial organizations that already exist at the campus (“Black Student Union, Hispanic American Leadership Organization and Asian Student Conference”), adding:

“Having served on a diversity empowerment inclusion committee within the student senate for the past few years, these agencies have made our job a lot easier,” Gallegos said. “We already have this relationship established and having that has made leaps and bounds in the things that we can do as a DEI [Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion] committee and so having the agencies has been amazing.”

It appears she is entirely sincere about eliminating partisan politics as president. When the College Fix emailed her for comment about her election victory as president, she did not reply. By doing so she signaled clearly that as student president it was not her job to fuel the partisan fires by talking to a conservative press outlet. Her job was to work with all students to make their campus life more fulfilling.

Though one might question her willingness to accept the existence of these racially-based clubs, they are there, and it would be self-defeating on her part to oppose them. She instead has clearly decided that it is better to work with them, demanding from them the same non-partisan, non-political stance that she is taking. Initially these organizations were formed as cultural centers, not partisan organizations devoted to promoting leftist politics. Gallegos’ effort is clearly aimed at pushing them back to that mold.

This victory is really only a small one, but it demonstrates that it is never a good plan to bow to tyrants, no matter how petty. Fight them, hard! You might not win, as Gallegos did, but the battle itself will reveal to all what kind of people these goons really are, and thus it will discredit them. And it will also make you look good, as someone who stands for freedom, free speech, and just treatment for all.

Conscious Choice cover

From the press release: In this ground-breaking new history of early America, historian Robert Zimmerman not only exposes the lie behind The New York Times 1619 Project that falsely claims slavery is central to the history of the United States, he also provides profound lessons about the nature of human societies, lessons important for Americans today as well as for all future settlers on Mars and elsewhere in space.

 
Conscious Choice: The origins of slavery in America and why it matters today and for our future in outer space, is a riveting page-turning story that documents how slavery slowly became pervasive in the southern British colonies of North America, colonies founded by a people and culture that not only did not allow slavery but in every way were hostile to the practice.  
Conscious Choice does more however. In telling the tragic history of the Virginia colony and the rise of slavery there, Zimmerman lays out the proper path for creating healthy societies in places like the Moon and Mars.

 

“Zimmerman’s ground-breaking history provides every future generation the basic framework for establishing new societies on other worlds. We would be wise to heed what he says.” —Robert Zubrin, founder of founder of the Mars Society.

 

Available everywhere for $3.99 (before discount) at Amazon, Barnes & Noble, and all ebook vendors, or direct from the ebook publisher, ebookit. And if you buy it from ebookit you don't support the big tech companies and I get a bigger cut much sooner.

2 comments

  • Deserttrek

    I congratulate her. This article is another clear example of why there should not be a student government, court or recognized groups. A waste of money and resources. These institutions help to develop the bureaucrats and politicians we have today. Go to school and otherwise STFU.

  • David Telford

    It is encouraging to see someone pursue and win authority using the sensibilities and understanding of “common sense” as many of us know it. The question I have is why the kooks and weirdos seem to have such sway in the halls of power. They make bad decisions, say things We the People often disagree with, and usually cannot even relate to. Yet they get elected, take power, and hold power time and again.

    What’s with that?

Readers: the rules for commenting!

 

No registration is required. I welcome all opinions, even those that strongly criticize my commentary.

 

However, name-calling and obscenities will not be tolerated. First time offenders who are new to the site will be warned. Second time offenders or first time offenders who have been here awhile will be suspended for a week. After that, I will ban you. Period.

 

Note also that first time commenters as well as any comment with more than one link will be placed in moderation for my approval. Be patient, I will get to it.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.