Conscious Choice cover

From the press release: In this ground-breaking new history of early America, historian Robert Zimmerman not only exposes the lie behind The New York Times 1619 Project that falsely claims slavery is central to the history of the United States, he also provides profound lessons about the nature of human societies, lessons important for Americans today as well as for all future settlers on Mars and elsewhere in space.

 
Conscious Choice: The origins of slavery in America and why it matters today and for our future in outer space, is a riveting page-turning story that documents how slavery slowly became pervasive in the southern British colonies of North America, colonies founded by a people and culture that not only did not allow slavery but in every way were hostile to the practice.  
Conscious Choice does more however. In telling the tragic history of the Virginia colony and the rise of slavery there, Zimmerman lays out the proper path for creating healthy societies in places like the Moon and Mars.

 

“Zimmerman’s ground-breaking history provides every future generation the basic framework for establishing new societies on other worlds. We would be wise to heed what he says.” —Robert Zubrin, founder of founder of the Mars Society.

 

Available everywhere for $3.99 (before discount) at Amazon, Barnes & Noble, and all ebook vendors, or direct from the ebook publisher, ebookit. And if you buy it from ebookit you don't support the big tech companies and I get a bigger cut much sooner.


Radio outbursts near center of Milky Way baffle astronomers

Astronomers have discovered a repeating radio outbursts near center of Milky Way that does not match any previously known phenomenon.

According to a new paper accepted for publication in The Astrophysical Journal and posted on the preprint server arXiv, the energy source is extremely finicky, appearing bright in the radio spectrum for weeks at a time and then completely vanishing within a day. This behavior doesn’t quite fit the profile of any known type of celestial body, the researchers wrote in their study, and thus may represent “a new class of objects being discovered through radio imaging.”

The radio source — known as ASKAP J173608.2−321635 — was detected with the Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder (ASKAP) radio telescope, situated in the remote Australian outback. In an ASKAP survey taken between April 2019 and August 2020, the strange signal appeared 13 times, never lasting in the sky for more than a few weeks, the researchers wrote. This radio source is highly variable, appearing and disappearing with no predictable schedule, and doesn’t seem to appear in any other radio telescope data prior to the ASKAP survey.

The object is even more unique in that it apparently has not been emitting any energy in any other wavelengths, including optical, infrared, or X-rays, something that such repeating outbursts usually do. So far about four such objects have been seen near the galactic center, though this new object’s behavior is not quite the same as the other three.

This is not a signal from alien life. Its energy and nature clearly makes it some form of astronomical object, though what that object is remains unknown. That such objects have so far only been detected near the center of the galaxy, where the environment is especially strange because of the presence of the supermassive black hole dubbed Sagittarius A* (pronounced A-star), suggests we really do not understand the astronomical possibilities in such regions.

Readers!
 

My July fund-raising campaign for 2021 has now ended. Thank you all for your donations and subscriptions. While this year’s campaign was not as spectacular as last year’s, it was the second best July campaign since I began this website.


And if you have not yet donated or subscribed, and you think what I write here is worth your support, you can still do so. I depend on this support to remain independent and free to write what I believe, without any pressure from others. Nor do I accept advertisements, or use oppressive social media companies like Google, Twitter, and Facebook. I depend wholly on the direct support of my readers.


If you choose to help, you can contribute via Patreon or PayPal. To use Patreon, go to my website there and pick one of five monthly subscription amounts, or by making a one-time donation. For PayPal click one of the following buttons:
 


 

Or with a subscription with regular donations from your Paypal or credit card account:


 

If Patreon or Paypal don't work for you, you can support Behind The Black directly by sending your donation by check, payable to Robert Zimmerman, to
 

Behind The Black
c/o Robert Zimmerman
P.O.Box 1262
Cortaro, AZ 85652

8 comments

  • Lee Stevenson

    A very small, but annoying to me point, quote “The object is even more unique”

    Unique is unique. There are no variables. Nothing can be more unique than unique. It is uniquely unique.

    Sorry to be “that guy” , but this misuse of the word “unique” annoys me.

  • Col Beausabre

    Lee, Scond the motion! “Unique” is singular, the one and only.

  • My Mom made the same point as Lee Stevenson and the COL. It made a lasting impression. Yes, unique is one and only. Not one of a kind, because if you only have ‘one’, you can’t have a ‘kind’.

  • When I read the headline, my first question was, if we would pass these outbursts through an AM detector, would we hear the voice of Wolfman Jack and/or the call letters “XERF”?

    Anywhere, y’all,
    everywhere, y’all,
    I heard it, I heard it,
    I heard it on the X.

  • Steve Richter

    The Milky Way is 13.5 billion years old The Earth and its solar system is 4.5 billion years old. Meaning there are much older solar systems in the Milky Way than that of our Sun. Are those older solar system evenly distributed in our Galaxy? Or clustered closer to the center, maybe? I know Bob said this is not a sign of alien life. But, would it be factual to say that the closer to the center of a galaxy, the more ancient the solar systems and the more likely there is the chance of intelligent and advanced life?

  • wayne

    Steve–
    Ref- “…would it be factual to say that the closer to the center of a galaxy, the more ancient the solar systems….”

    Not necessarily–it is assumed that the first generation(s) of stars to form tended to be massive and their lifespans were in the hundreds of millions of years. That would place an upper limit on the time available for the solar systems for those stars, to foster ‘life’ of some sort.
    Our Sun, in contrast, should continue for another 5 billion+ years before it enters the red-giant phase.
    Tangential factoid– for our galaxy, there is a star ‘about every 4 light years,’ on average.

    –fascinating question! I’d like to hear from someone with more knowledge than I, on this one.

  • Steve Richter: The center of the galaxy might have older material, but it is also a much more hostile environment for the development of life. If any intelligent species formed there, say 10 billion years ago, that civilization was probably forced to move itself outward to survive.

    The key for creating life on a planet appears to require the star to travel in relatively benign environments for long periods, as the Sun apparently has been doing. Less radiation, fewer supernovae, gamma ray bursts, and other nearby radiation events to kill things.

    Thus, the spiral arms, or even the gaps between them, might be more likely sites to search for alien life.

  • Steve Richter

    would be incredible to live in a solar system where other solar systems are relatively close by. Could a cluster of solar systems provide protection to its members against outside radiation bursts? Or on a planet with a stronger magnetic field than that of earth, does radiation protection increase geometrically? And do solar systems closer to the center of a galaxy have more planets, increasing the chance of an Earth like planet? Maybe there is more interstellar gas and dust closer to the galaxy center, which would absorb and deflect harmful radiation.

Readers: the rules for commenting!

 

No registration is required. I welcome all opinions, even those that strongly criticize my commentary.

 

However, name-calling and obscenities will not be tolerated. First time offenders who are new to the site will be warned. Second time offenders or first time offenders who have been here awhile will be suspended for a week. After that, I will ban you. Period.

 

Note also that first time commenters as well as any comment with more than one link will be placed in moderation for my approval. Be patient, I will get to it.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *