Rosetta photographs outburst on Comet 67P/C-G


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The Rosetta science team today released data and images of a February 19, 2016 outburst on Comet 67P/C-G that the spacecraft was able to photograph, as it happened.

A strong brightening of the comet’s dusty coma was seen by the OSIRIS wide-angle camera at 09:40 GMT, developing in a region of the comet that was initially in shadow. Over the next two hours, Rosetta recorded outburst signatures that exceeded background levels in some instruments by factors of up to a hundred. For example, between about 10:00–11:00 GMT, ALICE saw the ultraviolet brightness of the sunlight reflected by the nucleus and the emitted dust increase by a factor of six, while ROSINA and RPC detected a significant increase in gas and plasma, respectively, around the spacecraft, by a factor of 1.5–2.5.

In addition, MIRO recorded a 30ºC rise in temperature of the surrounding gas. Shortly after, Rosetta was blasted by dust: GIADA recorded a maximum hit count at around 11:15 GMT. Almost 200 particles were detected in the following three hours, compared with a typical rate of 3–10 collected on other days in the same month.

Be sure an look at the animated gif at the link.

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One comment

  • wayne

    Very cool development! (the animated gif is spectacular, despite the lag between images)

    Q: Is this exclusively an on-comet event? I mean– any chance it was hit by something which caused the landslide which exposed the water, etc. ?

    Unfortunately, the “Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society” are behind a pay-wall, ‘cuz I’d like to read the whole Paper.

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