Russia to lower launch price of new Angara rocket


Pioneer cover

From the press release: From the moment he is handed a possibility of making the first alien contact, Saunders Maxwell decides he will do it, even if doing so takes him through hell and back.

 
Unfortunately, that is exactly where that journey takes him.

 
The vision that Zimmerman paints of vibrant human colonies on the Moon, Mars, the asteroids, and beyond, indomitably fighting the harsh lifeless environment of space to build new societies, captures perfectly the emerging space race we see today.


He also captures in Pioneer the heart of the human spirit, willing to push forward no matter the odds, no matter the cost. It is that spirit that will make the exploration of the heavens possible, forever, into the never-ending future.

 
Available everywhere for $3.99 (before discount) at amazon, Barnes & Noble, all ebook vendors, or direct from the ebook publisher, ebookit.
 

Capitalism in space: According to its 2019 financial report, the Russian manufacturer of that country’s new Angara rocket intends by 2024 to lower launch price from about $100 million to about $57 million.

The high cost price of the latest Angara carrier rocket before the start of its serial production is due to the need for the Khrunichev Space Center to work at two sites, the press office of the State Space Corporation Roscosmos told TASS on Monday. “Before the production process is fully moved to the site of the Polyot company in Omsk, the Khrunichev Space Center has to work at two production sites, which creates additional overhead costs,” a Roscosmos spokesman said.

As part of its trials, the Angara rocket is being produced singly instead of serially, he said. “After the serial full-cycle production is launched, the item’s cost price will decrease,” the spokesman said.

Essentially they are claiming that the cost will drop once they start full production.

Share
Readers!
 

Every July, to celebrate the anniversary of the start of Behind the Black in 2010, I hold a month-long fund-raising campaign to make it possible for me to continue my work here for another year.
 

This year's fund-raising drive however is more significant in that it is also the 10th anniversary of this website's founding. It is hard to believe, but I have been doing this for a full decade, during which I have written more than 22,000 posts, of which more than 1,000 were essays and almost 2,600 were evening pauses.
 

This year's fund drive is also more important because of the growing intolerance of free speech and dissent in American culture. Increasingly people who don't like what they read are blatantly acting to blackball sites like mine. I have tried to insulate myself from this tyrannical effort by not depending on Google advertising or cross-posts Facebook or Twitter. Though this prevents them from having a hold on me, it also acts to limit my exposure.
 

Therefore, I hope you will please consider donating to Behind the Black, by giving either a one-time contribution or a regular subscription, as outlined in the tip jar below. Your support will allow me to continue covering science and culture as I have for the past twenty years, independent and free from any outside influence.


 

Regular readers can support Behind The Black with a contribution via paypal:

Or with a subscription with regular donations from your Paypal or credit card account:


 

If Paypal doesn't work for you, you can support Behind The Black directly by sending your donation by check, payable to Robert Zimmerman, to
 
Behind The Black
c/o Robert Zimmerman
P.O.Box 1262
Cortaro, AZ 85652

2 comments

  • Jay

    So far they have only two launches of this rocket, both in 2014, one sub-orbital and one to GEO. Still one more test flight to go. The payload capacity is similar to the Falcon 9 and it is to replace the Proton-M.

    So I saw a website that is also carrying this story: https://www.kxan36news.com/rocket-angara-was-three-times-more-expensive-proton There are some grammar and spelling errors, but the numbers look good. So the current price for the Angara-A5 is three times that of the Proton-M and will be one and one-half times the cost once in production.

    Just some notes on the two:
    The Proton-M uses UDMH as fuel vs. Angara with its LOX/RP-1 engines. Angara can lift more than the Proton. The Proton-M has had 109 launches with 98 successes and 11 failures.

  • Max

    Rocket technology has been developing since the 40s. You would think with all the advancement of technology, Successful rockets would become commonplace by now. Apparently it’s not so simple… It’s funny that space X makes it seem effortless in comparison. Futuristic vision of private investor, combined with tenacity and capabilities unshackled by government handcuffs. Free enterprise is awesome.

    Any clue yet as to what the Iranians put in space? It seemed to surprise everyone.

    https://www.haaretz.com/israel-news/.premium-iran-successfully-military-spy-satellite-israel-should-worry-revolutionary-guard-corps-1.8798308

    “a small orbiting satellite with a payload of up to 50 kg (110 lbs) to low Earth orbit. “It’s military use is limited,” Rubin explains, adding that its altitude is too low to be used for communication. “It can be us only for reconnaissance, but with limited performance.”

    There’s a lot of concern that a rogue country such as this could be used as a tool. A nuclear weapon launched to take down the grid with an EMP. In theory 90% of the population could be dead before power can be restored. (that’s not including any counterattacks)
    A recent evaluation of our vulnerabilities concluded that “nine” key transformers is all it would take from a terrorist action to take down the grid and our economy as well as military installations which have become dependent on external power sources.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *