The companies building manned spacecraft for the United States all appear to be on track.


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The companies building manned spacecraft for the United States all appear to be on track.

The report gives a nice overview of the recent achievements of all three companies, and suggests that the U.S. will once again have a manned spacecraft capability before the decade has ended coming from more than one design.

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7 comments

  • Lockheed Martin’s Orion MPCV is also on track. Despite innuendo to the contrary.

  • Orion might be on track, but it doesn’t have a launch vehicle, tied as it is to the ball-and-chain called SLS. Dragon, CST-100, and Dream Chaser are instead being designed for rockets that presently exist and will fly.

  • wodun

    And Orion gets more money than commercial crew. We, not just NASA, get 3 vehicles for a fraction of Orion’s cost.

  • And Orion is still on track. I just demand accuracy, that’s all. I understand and agree with your other points.

  • Since I expect SLS to die without accomplishing much, Orion will either die also, or get hitched to another wagon to survive. It is my hope that Lockheed Martin eventually finds a way to hitch to that other wagon, and then make money with Orion.

  • Pzatchok

    SLS and Orion were never meant to fly.

    They are just a great way to funnel cash to congresses greatest benefactors.

    Otherwise SLS would already be built and lifting cargo and other payloads. The fact is the dang thing isn’t even up to testing yet and at NASA’s rate the thing will never be ready to fly.

  • Edward

    I’m still rooting for Orion — so long as it can fly multiple times each year.

    I’m not rooting so much for SLS, as it can only fly once every few years and costs a fortune to develop.

    With luck, there will be an alternate launcher for Orion so that America can get back into space exploration.

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