The most powerful rocket presently in service, the Delta-4 Heavy, successfully launched a U.S. surveillance satellite this morning.


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The most powerful rocket presently in service, the Delta-4 Heavy, successfully launched a U.S. surveillance satellite this morning.

The booster features three core rocket boosters and is topped with a second stage to place payloads into orbit. It is 235 feet tall (72 meters) and can carry payloads of up to 24 tons into low-Earth orbit and 11 tons to geosynchronous orbits.

SpaceX’s proposed Falcon Heavy would launch about 50 tons into low Earth orbit, making it twice as powerful, should it be built. The next obvious question, which I can’t answer at the moment, is how do these two rockets compare in terms of cost?

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5 comments

  • wade

    that is very True. a cost comparison will unwillingly occur Soon. i am a fan of the Delta series of launch vehicles, yet i have deep interest in Space Ex as , not only a more than viable success in all assets of space launch systems, but of an engineering edge towards the future of human space flight to Mars n beyond. their recent test fie of the up graded engine not only speaks for itself, but delivers a very Loud Shout at the World .

  • wade

    that is very True. a cost comparison will unwillingly occur Soon. i am a fan of the Delta series of launch vehicles, yet i have deep interest in Space Ex as , not only a more than viable success in all assets of space launch systems, but of an engineering edge towards the future of human space flight to Mars n beyond. their recent test fire of the up- graded engine not only speaks for itself, but delivers a very Loud Shout at the World .

  • wade

    there. perhaps i should edit before posting. i love physics but scanned through most of the rest while in school.

  • Chris Kirkendall

    You’re forgiven – been there, done that ! !

  • Prices are subject to negotiation. Competition brings them down. Yeah, competition.

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