Three launches scrubbed


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Capitalism in space: Both SpaceX and Blue Origin scrubbed planned launches today due to what appear to be minor technical issues.

SpaceX was launching a GPS satellite for the military, while Blue Origin was going to fly its New Shepard suborbital spacecraft on its third flight. SpaceX will try again tomorrow, while Blue Origin has not yet announced a new launch date.

Meanwhile, ULA’s attempt to launch a National Reconnaissance Office (NRO) spy satellite tonight with its most powerful rocket, the Delta 4 Heavy, faces bad weather, with only a 20% chance of launch.

UPDATE: I missed a third launch scrub today, Arianespace’s attempt to launch a trio of French military satellites using a Soyuz rocket from French Guiana. They will try again tomorrow.

This means there will be three launch attempts tomorrow, since India plans a launch of its GSLV rocket as well.

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One comment

  • Dick Eagleson

    ULA has subsequently scrubbed the NROL-71 mission because the weather did not, in fact, cooperate and has rescheduled it for tomorrow as well. If all three U.S.-based launch missions make it off their pads tomorrow, and the ESA Soyuz and Indian GSLV as well, that will make five launches from three continents in a single day – four to orbit and one suborbital. Heckuva day if everyone involved pulls off their parts of it. Visiting aliens might think they’ve come across the equivalent of a small-town bus depot. Welcome to a sneak preview of the future I guess.

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