Conscious Choice cover

From the press release: In this ground-breaking new history of early America, historian Robert Zimmerman not only exposes the lie behind The New York Times 1619 Project that falsely claims slavery is central to the history of the United States, he also provides profound lessons about the nature of human societies, lessons important for Americans today as well as for all future settlers on Mars and elsewhere in space.

 
Conscious Choice: The origins of slavery in America and why it matters today and for our future in outer space, is a riveting page-turning story that documents how slavery slowly became pervasive in the southern British colonies of North America, colonies founded by a people and culture that not only did not allow slavery but in every way were hostile to the practice.  
Conscious Choice does more however. In telling the tragic history of the Virginia colony and the rise of slavery there, Zimmerman lays out the proper path for creating healthy societies in places like the Moon and Mars.

 

“Zimmerman’s ground-breaking history provides every future generation the basic framework for establishing new societies on other worlds. We would be wise to heed what he says.” —Robert Zubrin, founder of founder of the Mars Society.

 

Available everywhere for $3.99 (before discount) at Amazon, Barnes & Noble, and all ebook vendors, or direct from the ebook publisher, ebookit. And if you buy it from ebookit you don't support the big tech companies and I get a bigger cut much sooner.


Trump says he “single-handedly” decided to move Space Force command from Colorado to Alabama

On Friday former President Donald Trump stated that it was his decision to put the headquarters of the new Space Force in Alabama, not in Colorado where most military related space operations have been located for decades.

“Space Force — I sent to Alabama,” Trump said. “I hope you know that. (They) said they were looking for a home and I single-handedly said, ‘Let’s go to Alabama.’ They wanted it. I said, ‘Let’s go to Alabama. I love Alabama.’”

U.S. Rep. Doug Lamborn, a Republican who represents Colorado Springs, said Trump’s remarks were “an admission” that the headquarters move “was based solely on politics and personal preference — not the Air Force’s basing criteria or national security.”

When this decision was announced in January, I then believed porkmeister Senator Richard Shelby (R-Alabama) had forced it through, but it appears now that is wrong. It was Trump, but still for reasons of pork.

This was a bad decision, one that from the beginning was going to have both practical and political opposition. For practical reasons Colorado always made better sense as Space Force headquarters because it would require less relocation of assets. For political reasons it was flying in the face of a lot of well-established vested interests in Colorado.

Trump’s admission yesterday will likely provide the final bit of ammunition needed by Colorado politicians to get it overturned.

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18 comments

  • David M. Cook

    Perhaps it‘s better to be in Alabama. Huntsville doesn‘t freeze in Winter, there‘s no need for the mountain and they are next door to the Marshall facility (or should be). This could give new life to the center, designing all kinds of 21st century space vehicles to counter the Chinese space threat. It would likely make Jeff Wright pleased, as well!

  • pzatchok

    I would have chosen Texas, Florida or California. Or New Mexico.
    New Mexico would be better.
    Low population. Large flat lands. Way from vulnerable coasts. Easy to secure
    Its not in a hurricane or tornado zone.

  • Chris Lopes

    The Springs always made more sense. The rest of the space related stuff is already here. Being close to Marshall doesn’t give you anything. It’s like saying the Pentagon should be moved to wherever weapons systems are designed and built.

  • Jeff Wright

    We are a redder state. It needed to be here….the land of the ABMA. We were robbed. This rights past wrongs. Let them sniff coke.

    You need to visit Alabama, Robert. We don’t have horns.

  • Jeff Wright: I’ve been to Marshall. Even gave a speech there. Lots of good engineers wasting their lives doing badly managed government make-work.

  • MDN

    The entire intention of Space Force was to create a new branch of the military focused specifically on the unique requirements of this domain. Thus basing it away from the existing assets and organizations could make some sense to isolate it from the legacy services and their parochial mindset. Not saying it will work, but our military industrial bureaucracy is decidedly unimaginative and we really need forward thinkers for this organization.

    The Pentagon built our existing space asset infrastructure which is great. But it is a fleet of 2 or 3 dozen battleship platforms that are expensive, relatively vulnerable, and slow to upgrade and evolve. Why didn’t they conceive and build Starlink before SpaceX? A constellation of thousands is invulnerable to easy attack, the latency, bandwidth, pervasive and persistent global coverage of the network etc. are ideal for military applications, and they are deployed at the rate of a batch a month so can continuously adopt and deploy new tech and capabilities. And how hard would it be to layer in electro optical sensors as part of the platform? Yeah, you need a few 3m class surveillance sats for super high res, but 5000 .5m scopes could provide A LOT of realtime asset monitoring!

    My 2 cents anyway.

  • Joe

    MDM- The better play is to partner with commercial companies and get preferential treatment for imagery. Admittedly I am biased as I am building small sats to do exactly what you have laid out.

  • pzatchok

    There is no need for anything space related to be located anywhere close to Marshal Space center.

    They are at best investment speculators and not designers.
    They offer prizes for ideas and provide cash for their chosen ones.

    We do not base our navy at the ship yard. We base them at strategic places.

    Since most of our space services will be needed in the northern hemisphere we have no real need to launch from close to the equator.
    The greater need is security. The US desert area would be best for this, if your going to have a militarized launch facility.

    Come to think about it we already have a great place. Groom lake.

    Just guild an assembly building and a few launch towers.

  • Ray Van Dune

    I think you have to build them before you guild them! Or gild them…

  • Jeff Wright

    I don’t think those engineers are wasting their lives at all. What Kerry is to coal miners, you are to them…It is not a bit different than saying coal miners are in “the wrong jobs.”

  • Cavehobbit

    I wonder if this decision was made before or after Trump found out just how badly suborned the military command structure is to the leftist DNC cabal?

    Placing Space Force Command away from the center of that power may make it less vulnerable to corrupt influences.

  • commodude

    There’s something to be said for uprooting the existing installation, leaving the dross behind, culling what isn’t needed, and starting new.

    The location may be pork, but the growth opportunity afforded by building from the ground up and abandoning the existing clique has much to recommend it. Easier to exercise bureaucratic demons that way.

  • There’s something to be said for uprooting the existing installation, leaving the dross behind, culling what isn’t needed, and starting new.

    I think it would be a great idea to move the Executive Branch to the middle of Kansas – near Hutchinson, or wherever the salt deposits would allow underground facilities to be built for secure areas – and put the various agencies in non-urban-feedlot places where they are actually relevant. Turn DC into a city of museums.

    And while we’re at it, how about spreading out Congress, back to their districts/states, and hook them up through secure teleconferencing from publicly-accessible studios in-district, so that their constituents can see them in action, and watch them carefully?

    This would also increase the opportunities for those other than professional politicians to serve in those offices; not uprooting them from their home states makes it easier both to serve, and to return to private life after a few years instead of becoming the poster children for term limits and/or moving to pseudo-private K Street (though I do think term limits are still prudent, even with this TeleCongress).

    We certainly need to relocate all of the above, out of the stew of collusion, corruption and realpolitik known as Washington DC.

    Not to mention, DC is a prime target for a decapitation strike to come in from the ocean. We’d get a few more minutes of warning if the President was in Kansas.

  • Jeff Wright

    That’s the best idea yet. Green too. Stay in your districts where we can see you…with DC itself all museums. Wall it off from the rioters. Defang the snake.

  • Gary

    Jeff, you obviously love the folks at Marshall and your loyalty is commendable. But the analogy of those engineers and coal miners just doesn’t hold up. Coal miners do dangerous, dirty work on a daily basis to provide a significant proportion (still) of the energy which keeps the lights (and other things) on in this country. As best I can tell, Marshall engineers are employed to design systems which don’t fly and just suck up tax dollars. If you eliminated coal miners, the country would grind to a halt. If you eliminated Marshall, not many folks would notice.

    It pains me to write that because Redstone Arsenal, Werner Von Braun and the Germans and all those other folks were mythic figures in my childhood. But, just because they put us on the moon nearly 60 years ago, isn’t an excuse for their engineering descendants to have a lifetime employment, especially when the systems they are working on are a dead end.

  • Kyle

    A day late here, but I like the idea of moving the Space Force away from the Air Force. Separate the new armed forces from the older more established and dominate one or risk it being absorbed back into it at a later date. Moving to Alabama on the other had, while its a state that doesn’t get much love, at least its not Virginia, no offence to Virginians, but there are way too many Federal Government buildings and offices and employees in that State. Alabama does scream of Pork and those are the poorly managed jobs they are protecting. I would of picked Utah or Nebraska, or even Wyoming, if the goal was to center it in the country, but with ICBMs and rockets I doubt it matters where its located.

  • Jay

    Kyle,
    To add to your Virginia comment, moving most of the Atlantic Fleet in the 1970’s from Newport R.I. to Norfolk Virginia was a bad idea. Yes it is closer to Annapolis, but it is closer to D.C. as a target. Newport was in between Boston and NYC, and had the protection of Narragansett Bay/Rhode Island Sound.

  • Edward

    Kyle,
    I think you are right that the new force needs separation from the old one but for a different reason. If they remain too close together, then the older force can influence the new one into acting more like the old force. The whole reason to create the Space Force was because the Air Force was not moving fast enough to protect our space assets. Separating them allows for a better chance that the new Space Force will act independent of the Air Force, and a better chance to do what it takes to protect our assets.

    I don’t think that an actual absorption is the danger but that a similar philosophy toward our space assets is the danger.

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