Video from Hayabusa-2’s touchdown


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The Hayabusa-2 science team has released a video taken of the spacecraft’s quick touchdown and sample grab on the asteroid Ryugu.

I have embedded the video below the fold. It not only shows the incredible rockiness of Ryugu’s surface, with the spacecraft barely missing a large rock as it came down, it also clearly shows the resulting debris cloud and surface changes after touchdown and the firing of Hayabusa-2’s projectile into the surface to throw up material that the spacecdraft could catch. You can actually see pebbles flying about below and around the spacecraft as it quickly retreats.

The Hayabusa-2 science team plans another touchdown in the next few months, this time using a different technique to disturb the surface and grab the resulting ejecta.

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3 comments

  • BSJ

    It would be very interesting to know how long it’s going to take for all that stuff to settle again! Sure was a lot of it!!! Are the collectors graded for pea gravel?

    I hope the explosive impactor doesn’t create a dangerously dense debris cloud…

  • Col Beausabre

    Figures. The Japanese reach another celestial object and what’s the first thing they do ? They bomb it. Shades of Nanking.

  • born01930

    Truly amazing. It boggles my mine seeing rocks like that. Where did they come from? Aren’t rocks a planetary creation? rather than star stuff?

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