Canyoneering in Death Valley

Slabby Acres

This past Thanksgiving weekend I joined some caving and canyoneering friends in Death Valley to celebrate the holiday in the great outdoors as well as explore some of the park’s more inaccessible canyons. We did not camp in the park, since campfires are not allowed and the park has a size limit for groups. Instead, we camped on BLM land just outside the park, in what appeared to be an abandoned RV trailer park that canyoneerers call Slabby Acres.

First a primer. Regular readers will know that I have been doing cave exploration and mapping now for about thirty years. This recreational activity not only involves knowing how to use survey instruments in a cave, you need also to be trained in the vertical rope techniques required to reach some remote places underground, sometimes dropping multiple pits on the way in and climbing those same domes on the way out.

Canyoneering is somewhat similar to caving. Just like caving you need to know how to travel over boulders and rough terrain and also know how to rappel and climb ropes. Unlike caving the canyons are open to the sky, and you rarely climb the ropes to travel up the canyon. In canyoneering the goal is to find the head of the canyon and travel down its many drops to come out at the bottom safely, all the while getting to see some wild, majestic, and rarely seen places. In addition, modern canyoneering rarely involves virgin exploration. Most canyoneerers visit already explored canyons whose details are well documented so that they know what ropes to bring as well as how to find the canyons.

This was our goal this past weekend. Some of the western cavers who have joined my survey projects and learned how to cave survey are also active canyoneerers. While none of us had ever visited the canyons on our trip list, several were very experienced with finding and traversing places they had never been before. My plan was to follow them and enjoy the experience. Below are my pictures during one of this weekend’s canyoneering trips. The canyon is Scorpion Canyon. It was the first we visited and was relatively easy to do, only 4.6 miles long with only six rappels and only an 1,800 foot elevation drop. It would take us over one of the mountain ranges that form the eastern wall of Death Valley. In fact, this was how I was going to enter Death Valley for the first time. Rather than drive in, like most tourists, I would rappel in.
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Back from Death Valley

I have returned from Death Valley after a wonderful five days exploring four different canyons in this quite amazing place. I will do some catch up posting tonight and tomorrow, as well as post a description, with some pictures, of my experience rappelling down some of the rarely visited canyons of the park.

Off to Death Valley

For the next five days I expect to be completely out of touch with the internet universe. I and a bunch of friends are heading to Death Valley to do some canyoneering. We intend to explore a number of the slot canyons there that are rarely visited.

It might be possible to get internet access, but I am not betting on it. We will be camping in some remote areas. And despite this, we also plan on Thursday to put together a potluck turkey dinner for everyone to eat. Should make for the most interesting Thanksgiving I have ever had.

Thus, I wish now to extend to all my readers the happiest and most grateful Thanksgiving. May the coming year bring you joy and celebration, as well as many good surprises that make your lives better.