Today’s blacklisted American: Professor fired without due process for lamenting the poor education often received by blacks

Today's modern witch hunt
Burning witches in academia: It’s the IN thing.

They’re coming for you next: Sandra Sellers, a law professor at Georgetown University Law Center in Virginia was immediately fired by her dean without any investigation, based on an intentional false misreading of of her words said during what she thought was a private Zoom phone conversation.

Last month, Georgetown Law adjunct professor Sandra Sellers told a colleague privately on Zoom, “I hate to say this—I end up having this angst every semester that a lot of my lower [graded] ones are blacks.” Some black students, Sellers said, did well, but the overall pattern made her “feel bad.”

Sellers was not aware that her conversation was being recorded and uploaded to the aptly named “Panopto” software system. If someone had chosen to, he might have clipped her words and posted them to Twitter with the caption: “We need more white professors like this, who feel shame about how badly law schools are failing students of color. Thank you, Professor Sellers!” Instead, Sellers’ words were clipped and posted by Georgetown Law student Hassan Ahmad with the caption: “.@GeorgetownLaw negotiations professors Sandra Sellers and David Batson being openly racist on a recorded Zoom call. Beyond unacceptable.”

That day, without speaking with Sellers, William Treanor condemned her “reprehensible statements,” which he declared “abhorrent.” The next day, against his own university’s policies, Treanor fired Sellers without an official investigation.

Treanor also suspended without investigation David Batson, the law professor whom Sellers was speaking to.

The moral and legal violations here were not committed by Sellers by her words, since she was simply expressing a concern for her minority students and her frustration that she had not been able to figure out a way to help them do better. No, let me list the real violators to truth and justice:
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