Cracks in pedestrian bridge possible root of failure


Chronological Encyclopedia of Discoveries in Space cover

After being in print for twenty years, the Chronological Encyclopedia of Discoveries in Space, covering everything that was learned on every single space mission in the 20th century, has finally gone out of print.

 
I presently have my last four hardback copies available for sale. The book sold new for about $90. To get your own autographed copy of this now rare collector's item, please send a $120 check (which includes shipping) payable to Robert Zimmerman to


Behind The Black, c/o Robert Zimmerman
P.O.Box 1262
Cortaro, AZ 85652


"Useful to space buffs and generalists, comprehensive but readable, Bob Zimmerman's Encyclopedia belongs front and center on everyone's bookshelf." -- Mike Collins, Apollo 11 astronaut

 

"The Chronological Encylopedia of Discoveries in Space is no passionless compendium of information. Robert Zimmerman's fact-filled reports, which cover virtually every spacecraft or probe to have ventured into the heavens, relate the scientific and technical adventure of space exploration enthusiastically and with authority." -- American Scientist

Cracks found in a Florida pedestrian bridge prior to its collapse, killing six, might have indicated the upcoming failure.

A key concrete support truss in the doomed Florida International University pedestrian bridge developed worrisome cracks 10 days before the structure was lifted into place over the Tamiami Trail, photographs and an internal email unintentionally released by the school show.

The documents, released in response to public records requests from the Miami Herald, show that FIU’s construction and engineering team discovered potentially problematic cracks in the bridge earlier than officials have previously acknowledged.

Because of the ongoing investigation we do not yet how the engineering company building the bridge responded to the cracks. They might have analyzed them and dismissed them. Or the might have ignored them entirely.

Share

One comment

  • Cotour

    I find this strange.

    https://nypost.com/2018/05/14/crane-operator-fled-scene-after-fatal-florida-bridge-collapse-witness/

    Why would the operator move the crane 30 blocks to “clear the area for emergency workers”. The crane itself would be a vital piece of equipment in any rescue attempts.

    I think it is obvious that the crane which was lifting the tensioning equipment to the top of the structure to facilitate the workers activities but the crane itself was certainly not a part of the failure. I suspect that the crane operator, probably the owner, wanted to somehow limit liability.

    But his removing the crane might be seen as an irresponsible act that may have cost lives. (?)

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *