Police ramp up violence against Hong Kong protesters today


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This weekend’s Hong Kong protests against China’s rule resulted in increased violence by the police against the protesters.

In the evening, clashes between police and demonstrators broke the peaceful rhythm in the afternoon rallies, repeating the pattern of past weekend protests. Police deployed water cannon trucks several times, unleashing blue-dyed water that would make it easier for police to identify frontline protesters. Police chased down protesters and beat them up with batons, injuring multiple people in the head. One person was injured in the left eye, reportedly by a police-fired projectile.

On Hennessy Road, where many protesters had gathered, police fired multiple rounds of tear gas and sponge grenades. Police also confirmed that they fired two live rounds near Victoria Park. There were no reported injuries in the area. It is unclear why police decided to deploy their service weapons at the time.

Toward midnight, violence spread into subway stations in Kowloon district. At the Prince Edward metro station and several other stations in Kowloon, police charged into the station and into train cars, deploying pepper spray and beating their batons. Officers arrested at least a dozen individuals. Several unarmed passengers were seen bleeding from injuries.

More details at the link. It appears that the protests were peaceful for most of the day, until the police decided to move in and try to shut them down.

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4 comments

  • Col Beausabre

    Here’s a question for you, Will the employees at places like Google sign petitions that demand their companies not work with the US military, Homeland Security and ICE, demand that all contracts with the Chinese government be cancelled and that they withdraw from China until its censorship of the Net ceases and persecution of groups like the Uighurs ends? I think we all know what the answer is, don’t we?

  • Andrew

    Well…

    Not real happy with China’s response to the Hong Kong protests. But,… so far it is far more restrained than the Tank columns and fixed bayonets of Tienanmen Square.

    Hong Kong, mostly, belongs to Beijing now and the sovereign of China are still the sovereign laws of China. Break those laws, defy law enforcement and you fill suffer some kind of consequences, as you would in any nation when you violate the sovereign laws of that nation.

    I sincerely HOPE that those consequences remain restrained from previous benchmarks. But, there is little anyone outside China can do except cry about it if they do not.

  • Andrew

    addendum:

    Really wish the British hadn’t given the place back.

  • Andi

    Same here, but I don’t think that the British were in any position to do much about it. They had Hong Kong Island and Kowloon “in perpetuity”, but the lease on the New Territories was for 99 years and ran out in 1997. I don’t think China was too keen on renewing it.

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