A federal judge has permanently blocked use of the indefinite detention authority given to the President in the NDAA law passed by Congress last year.


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Sanity: A federal judge has permanently blocked the use of the indefinite detention authority given to the President in the NDAA law passed by Congress last year.

To quote the judge’s opinion:

The due process rights guaranteed by the Fifth Amendment require that an individual understand what conduct might subject him or her to criminal or civil penalties. Here, the stakes get no higher: indefinite military detention — potential detention during a war on terrorism that is not expected to end in the foreseeable future, if ever. The Constitution requires specificity — and that specificity is absent from § 1021(b)(2).

The law was blatantly unconstitutional and should never have been written in the first place. Shame on both Houses of Congress and President Obama for trying to force this obscenity through.

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One comment

  • jwing

    So who here thinks we are NOT yet at a tipping point in this country as to whether it will be “fundamentally changed?”

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