Mauna Kea visitor center reopens


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The visitor center on Mauna Kea was reopened this weekend after a month closure that supposedly forbid access by the public.

And yet, for that entire month, the state has allowed the protesters opposing construction of the Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT) to remain camped across the street.

To me, this illustrates where the state’s loyalties lie. They might talk a tough game, but they are really doing nothing to enforce the law and the legally negotiated agreements between the astronomical community and the various Hawaiian cultural institutions that had agreed on the conditions for building TMT. By allowing the protesters to continue to break the law and set up house on the mountain, the state is saying they really want construction to cease.

I say, maybe the time has come for astronomers to agree, and move lock, stock, and barrel south to Chile. In addition, maybe tourists should consider other places to visit, rather than a place that exhibits such hostility to outsiders.

8 comments

  • Frank

    More liberal sanctioned law breaking.
    Occupy Hawaii.

  • Cotour

    Unrelated but related:

    I watched a very beautiful helicopter fly over of all of the Hawaiian islands the other night, stunning! From the youngest, the big Island, of about 800 thousand years old, to the oldest, about 6 million years old, you can plainly and dramatically see the effects of erosion on the islands, the youngest is very big and very lush in vegetation and as you go North you can see how the islands are worn down by the atmosphere and erosion until you get to the oldest which is almost like a flat desert compared to the most Southern island.

    Q: Since erosion is obviously diminishing and “threatening” the islands existence and is “adversely” impacting the environment of the Hawaiian people shouldn’t the government declare erosion as one of the most important issues to address and control? Is erosion a national security threat?

  • Nick P

    “Since erosion is obviously diminishing and “threatening” the islands existence and is “adversely” impacting the environment of the Hawaiian people shouldn’t the government declare erosion as one of the most important issues to address and control? Is erosion a national security threat?”

    Perhaps the EPA should ban it?

  • Cotour

    There are islands to the North that were above sea level and that are very much under water as we speak, islands that have been “destroyed” by the atmosphere and erosion. The logic would follow that if we in fact control the climate to what ever degree that this would be something to be looked into to stop this threat.

    The verifiable evidence does seem to indicate a valid threat to the security of the United States and the world for that matter and it should probably be looked into. Unlike “global warming” there is no question that this erosion threat exists.

    I reiterate that it should always be the policy of government and industry to execute the highest levels of proven technology and developing technology in order to produce the cleanest energy and other industrial activities, in other words pollution.

  • Nick P

    “I reiterate that it should always be the policy of government and industry to execute the highest levels of proven technology and developing technology in order to produce the cleanest energy and other industrial activities, in other words pollution”

    So in other words, we should be going 100% nuclear.

  • Cotour

    Its never a good thing to think about things in such absolute terms, there is stability in diversity as a general rule. Many reasonable ways to skin the energy cat.

  • Steve

    Not only should we be building Nuclear plants, we should be spending money on fusion research instead of windmills……

  • I lived in Honolulu in 2000 while working on a Federal contract. I witnessed open racism and bigotry on the part of some Polynesians, to the point that I had equipment stolen from the job site and was confronted about why we didn’t hire Hawai’ians for the job (answer: because there weren’t any qualified people available). If you’re White and visiting Hawai’i, it’s probably a great place: if you live there; not so much. There wasn’t a week that went by where there wasn’t some sort of agitation against people of pallor.

    King Kamehameha is one of my heroes, but his people often fail to live up to his standard (MLK would understand). There’s only one place in Hawai’i I want to see, but other than that, I’ll take my money elsewhere.

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